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Article
October 1961

Tritiated Digoxin Studies in Human Subjects

Author Affiliations

LITTLE ROCK, ARK.

From Medical and Radioisotope Services, Veterans Administration Consolidated Hospital, and University of Arkansas Medical Center, Little Rock.; Cardiologist, Veterans Administration Consolidated Hospital, and Assistant Professor of Medicine, University of Arkansas Medical Center (Dr. Doherty); Chief, Radioisotope Service, Veterans Administration Consolidated Hospital, and Assistant Professor of Medicine, University of Arkansas Medical Center (Dr. Perkins); Instructor in Medicine, University of Arkansas Medical Center (Dr. Mitchell).

Arch Intern Med. 1961;108(4):531-539. doi:10.1001/archinte.1961.03620100023004
Abstract

A number of publications have appeared in recent years regarding the metabolic behavior, fate, and excretion of C14-labeled digitoxin.1-8 Labeled digoxin has received little attention.9-11 The preparation of a C14-labeled compound has not been practical because of the expense and uncertainty of the digoxin content of digitalis glycosides.

The possibility of a tritium (H3) label was explored and was found to be both cheap and practical utilizing the Wilzbach hydrogen exchange method. The present study was undertaken to study the serum levels, absorption, and excretion of tritium-labeled digoxin* in human subjects after singledose oral digitalization.

Most of the metabolic studies of unlabeled digoxin12,13 have revealed the presence of unchanged digoxin and metabolite "B" in the urine of both rats and humans. Brown and Wright14 reported the presence of metabolite "F" in the tissue of rats. Metabolite "B" has not been demonstrated

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