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Article
December 1963

Privy Counsel

Arch Intern Med. 1963;112(6):813-814. doi:10.1001/archinte.1963.03860060051001

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Abstract

It has bene in the former part hereof sufficiently proved, that there is no obscenitie, or barbarisme, in words concerning our necessaries: but now for the place, where these necessaries are to be done, perhaps some will object, that it was never of that importaunce but that it was left to each man's owne care to provide, for that which concerned his owne peculiar necessitie.

The English language is rich in short descriptive words. Many deal with certain physical acts which are vitally important to our well-being but which are not mentioned in polite company. We have a large host of Greek and Latin words which use a lot of ink and newsprint. I would not like to destroy our last vestige of privacy by repealing this custom and leaving the four-letter words outside.

Every now and then a book is printed which deals with such things as attending to

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