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Article
December 1963

Nephrotoxicity of Amphotericin B: A Clinical-Pathologic Study

Author Affiliations

LOS ANGELES

Head Physician, Chest Service, Los Angeles County General Hospital, Assistant Clinical Professor of Thoracic Diseases, Loma Linda University School of Medicine (Dr. Iovine); Director, Renal Laboratory, Loma Linda Service, Los Angeles County General Hospital, Associate Professor of Medicine, Loma Linda University School of Medicine (Dr. Berman); Instructor, Department of Pathology, University of Southern California School of Medicine (Dr. Halikis); Director of Graduate Training, Los Angeles County General Hospital, Associate Professor of Medicine, Loma Linda University School of Medicine (Dr. Mowrey); Fellow, Renal Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Loma Linda University School of Medicine (Dr. Chappelle); Associate Clinical Professor of Thoracic Diseases, Loma Linda University School of Medicine, Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine, University of Southern California School of Medicine (Dr. Gierson).

Arch Intern Med. 1963;112(6):853-862. doi:10.1001/archinte.1963.03860060091009
Abstract

Introduction  The nephrotoxicity associated with amphotericin B has beeen the greatest deterrent to its effective use1-6 in the treatment of systemic mycoses. The precise nature of this toxicity is obscure, and the available descriptions are conflicting.The present report is a study of renal function and morphology during amphotericin B therapy for Coccidioides immitis infections.

Material and Methods  Six patients with clinical and serologic evidence of disseminated coccidioidomycosis were studied before, during, and after therapy. Two of the patients had no previous treatment. The other four had prior amphotericin B therapy. Clinical details, including cumulative dosages, appear in Tables 1 and 2.Diagnosis of dissemination was based on isolation of C immitis from an extrapulmonary site or a maximum complement fixation titer of at least 1:32 (see Table 1). The diagnosis of coccidioidal meningitis was confirmed by the criteria employed by Einstein et al,7 ie, spinal fluid findings

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