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Article
July 1964

Primary Cutaneous Histoplasmosis: Report of a Case

Author Affiliations

KANSAS CITY, KAN; KANSAS CITY NORTH, MO; MOUNT VERNON, MO

Epidemiologist, Pulmonary Mycology Investigations Unit, Kansas City Field Station, Communicable Disease Center (Dr. Tosh); Resident in Pulmonary Diseases, Missouri State Sanatorium, present address: 2730 S Mall, Kansas City North, Mo. (Dr. Balhuizen); Chief of Medicine, and Medical Director, respectively, Missouri State Santorium (Drs. Yates and Brasher).; From the Communicable Disease Center, Public Health Service, US Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, and the Missouri State Sanatorium.

Arch Intern Med. 1964;114(1):118-119. doi:10.1001/archinte.1964.03860070164022
Abstract

Histoplasmosis was considered a rare and always fatal disease for many years after it was first described by Darling in 1906. However, recent epidemiological studies in the United States have revealed that in some states in the endemic area 60% to 70% of males aged 17 through 21 years have been infected with Histoplasma capsulatum.1 The respiratory tract is the usual portal of entry of the fungus with the primary lesion occurring in the lungs.2 Cases of histoplasmosis having skin lesions have been reported, but the skin lesions were usually the result of dissemination of the infection.3,4 The purpose of this paper is to report a case of primary cutaneous histoplasmosis which resulted from direct inoculation of the fungus through the skin.

Report of Case  On Jan 12, 1959, a 32-year-old white male who had recently moved into the endemic area for histoplasmosis assisted with an autopsy

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