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Article
October 1989

The Chairman as a Subspecialist

Author Affiliations

Pittsburgh, Pa

Arch Intern Med. 1989;149(10):2380. doi:10.1001/archinte.1989.00390100166036
Abstract

To the Editor.—The values of academic medicine are shaped by the leaders in the field. Chairmen of major medical centers provide the direction for faculty, house staff, and students alike. The chairman's interests and background may strongly influence the path of training and research of physicians within their department.

I examined the training of all chairmen of internal medicine in major academic centers as listed in the membership directory of the 1988 Association of Professors of Medicine. The type of fellowship or advanced training of each chairman was determined by the American Board of Medical Specialties Compendium of Certified Medical Specialties.1 Telephone calls were placed to the office of those chairmen who were not listed in this source to determine their training background. The results are listed in the Table.

All but eight chairmen received subspecialty training. Specialties, such as endocrinology, are repre

sented by a large percentage

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