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Article
April 1909

DEMONSTRATION OF THE TRICHINELLA SPIRALIS IN THE CIRCULATING BLOOD IN MAN

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1909;III(3):263-266. doi:10.1001/archinte.1909.00050140093009
Abstract

Since the first description of trichiniasis in man by Owen, in 1840, opinion has been divided as to the channels by which the embryos travel from the intestine to the muscles. Leuckart's1 authority has been potent in maintaining the traditional view that trichinellæ migrate actively through the connective-tissue planes, and this statement is frequent in text-books. The only experimental evidence for this has been the finding of the worm in the peritoneal, pleural and pericardial cavities, and the well-known fact that the diaphragm, and especially its crura, usually contains more encysted parasites than the rest of the body musculature.

Against this view the weight of experimental proof has been accumulating gradually. Zenker,2 in 1860, took the stand that the dissemination of the embryos to the muscles was probably by way of the chyle ducts and blood stream. Fiedler,3 in 1864, found embryos in the right

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