[Skip to Navigation]
Article
May 1909

BUCKWHEAT-POISONING: WITH REPORT OF A CASE IN MAN

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1909;III(4):350-359. doi:10.1001/archinte.1909.00050150081007
Abstract

Buckwheat-poisoning, or ``fagopyrismus,''1 may be defined as a disease which occurs in certain white or white-spotted animals that have been fed on the common buckwheat, Fagopyrum esculentum (Polygonum fagopyrum) or on the other species less frequently cultivated, Fagopyrum persicaria. Clinically, the milder forms of the disorder are associated with an itching erythema, situated mainly on the head and face, constipation and digestive disturbance, the more serious cases being attended by cutaneous, respiratory, febrile or urinary phenomena. Pathologically, there may be a vesicular, pustular, phlegmonous, or even gangrenous dermatitis, and inflammatory changes in the mucous membranes, the brain, nerves and lungs.

CAUSES  The etiology of fagopyrismus presents several features which deserve careful consideration. The disease is most common in swine and sheep, especially in pigs and lambs. It is occasionally seen in cattle and goats, and is rarest in the horse. White or spotted animals are said

Add or change institution
×