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Article
May 1909

STUDIES IN INACCESSIBLE INTERNAL HEMORRHAGES: II. THE INEFFECTIVENESS OF ADRENALIN IN PULMONARY HEMORRHAGE

Author Affiliations

DETROIT

From the Research Laboratory of Parke, Davis & Co.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1909;III(4):360-367. doi:10.1001/archinte.1909.00050150091008
Abstract

I. INTRODUCTION  The chief value of adrenalin in inaccessible hemorrhages consists in its ability to elevate the general pressure and direct a greater proportion of the blood still remaining within the body to the medulla, where its presence is needed to maintain the viability of the vital centers. To be practical in this capacity, it becomes imperative that it should not also increase the bleeding; in fact, it is desirable that hemorrhage should at the same time cease or diminish. In a recent research I showed that small doses of adrenalin (0.025 mg.), which I designated as "therapeutic doses," raised the pressure and diminished the bleeding from the intestinal vessels. In the present research the effect of adrenalin on pulmonary hemorrhages was investigated.

II. PREVIOUS WORK  Cybulsky and Syzmonowicz1 were probably the first to demonstrate experimentally that adrenalin slightly raised the pulmonary arterial pressure. Velich2 later found that

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