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Article
June 1909

EFFECT ON THE HEART OF EXPERIMENTAL OBSTRUCTION OF THE LEFT CORONARY ARTERY

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the Laboratory of Experimental Therapeutics, University of Chicago.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1909;III(5):476-484. doi:10.1001/archinte.1909.00050160109009
Abstract

The literature on experimental obstruction of the coronary arteries in animals is not extensive, although dating back to the seventeenth century, when Chirac tied the coronary artery of a dog and noted that the heart stopped beating in one minute.

The next reference to this subject is Erichsen's1 work in 1842, although previously to this Parry had published his observations on the relations existing between angina pectoris and sclerosis of the coronary arteries. Erichsen, recognizing obstruction of the cardiac vessels as a frequent cause of sudden death in man, ligated the coronary arteries near their origin in a pithed dog and reported gradually increasing bradycardia and finally cardiac standstill.

Panum,2 in 1862, attempted to obstruct the coronary arteries by injecting a mixture of oil, wax, tallow and lampblack into the aorta. As the vessels were incompletely plugged, his results are not of any special value.

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