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Article
July 1909

THE PREVALENCE AND IMPORTANCE OF UNCINARIASIS AMONG APPARENTLY HEALTHY SOUTHERN-BRED WHITE MEN IN THE UNITED STATES ARMY

Author Affiliations

JACKSON BARRACKS, LA

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1909;IV(1):8-20. doi:10.1001/archinte.1909.00050170013002
Abstract

Until very recently the prevalence of hookworm disease among soldiers who have always resided in the United States appears to have been very little investigated. The only mention of uncinariasis in the report of the Surgeon-General of the Army for 1908 is that an examination of the stools of 21 soldiers at Fort Root, who had recently returned from the Philippine Islands, showed all to contain ova of Ankylostoma duodenale. In 1904 the surgeon at Fort Porter, New York, reported the presence of ankylostoma in many cases admitted to hospital for other conditions; but where the infection probably originated is not stated in the reference to his work. On Dec. 7, 1908, Captain J. F. Siler, of the Medical Corps of the Army, stationed at the large recruit depot of Fort Slocum, New York, reported to the Surgeon-General that of 19 southern recruits examined, 16, or 84 per

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