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Article
September 1910

ANTERIOR POLIOMYELITIS: METHODS OF DIAGNOSIS FROM SPINAL FLUID AND BLOOD IN MONKEYS AND IN HUMAN BEINGS

Author Affiliations

BOSTON

From the Laboratory of Serum Diagnosis, Harvard Medical School.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1910;VI(3):330-338. doi:10.1001/archinte.1910.00050310101009
Abstract

The possibility of successfully combating acute anterior poliomyelitis in human beings depends not only on the prosecution of the recent fruitful experimental studies along the lines of etiology and specific therapy, but also on the establishment of an accurate method of diagnosis. There is perhaps no acute disease which, in its early stages, offers greater difficulties in differential diagnosis. The diagnosis is often impossible even at autopsy. From this very diagnostic difficulty has arisen a certain logical scepticism as to the etiological entity of anterior poliomyelitis, as separable from the forms of meningitis of known causation. The experimental disease, as produced in monkeys by intracerebral injection of an emulsion of the brain or cord of human cases, remains the best and rather persuasive evidence of the specificity of the disease.

This article deals with attempts to find a method of diagnosis from the blood or cerebrospinal fluid in

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