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Article
December 1910

PERNICIOUS ANEMIA MISTAKEN FOR AMEBIC ULCERATIVE COLITIS: WITH OBSERVATIONS ON THE IPECAC TREATMENT

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the service of Dr. T. C. Janeway, St. Luke's Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1910;VI(6):662-665. doi:10.1001/archinte.1910.00050340048005
Abstract

A case of pernicious anemia presenting a number of unusual features, among them some facts of interest in connection with the diagnosis and treatment of amebic colitis, seems worthy of record.

REPORT OF CASE 

History.  —The patient, a man aged 48, married, without children and having a good family history, was born in Tennessee, but for the past eight years had lived on fruit plantations in Cuba and Porto Rico. Beyond occasional indefinite stomach disturbances there had never been a significant illness.

Present Illness.  —This began in June, 1909, when there were loss of appetite, drowsiness, fatigue and loss of weight. In September, 1909 there was a diarrhea with mucus, but no blood. This was relieved by a milk diet, but recurred at intervals afterward, there being four to eight watery movements daily without pain or tenesmus. The abdomen was tender, particularly above the umbilicus. Vomiting occurred only twice. Fever

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