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Article
January 1911

DIPHTHERIA BACILLUS-CARRIERSWITH A REPORT OF A CASE TREATED BY OVERRIDING THE INFECTED AREA WITH STAPHYLOCOCCUS PYOGENES AUREUS

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1911;VII(1):16-23. doi:10.1001/archinte.1911.00060010023002
Abstract

The army medical officer and physicians associated with schools and factories are far more concerned about prophylactic measures than they are about the treatment of individual cases. It is far more important to guard an army corps or a large school or factory against an invasion of diphtheria or typhoid than it is to display great ability in treating such cases after they have arisen.

This distinction is that which separates the ``sanitarian'' from the ``physician,'' a distinction that is broader than it should be, for while a sanitarian may, without prejudice to his calling, be uninterested in the cure of disease, the physician cannot neglect his sanitary functions without fatal results. In a paper entitled ``Diphtheria Carriers,''1 by Myer Solis-Cohen, read in the Section on Hygiene and Sanitary Science of the American Medical Association, Chicago, 1908, the sanitary responsibility of the physician who treats cases of infectious disease

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