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Article
August 1911

CEREBROSPINAL MENINGITIS DUE TO BACILLUS INFLUENZÆA REPORT OF TWO CASES, FROM ONE OF WHICH THIS ORGANISM WAS OBTAINED IN PURE CULTURE FROM THE CIRCULATING BLOOD EIGHTY-FIVE DAYS BEFORE DEATH

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1911;VIII(2):133-140. doi:10.1001/archinte.1911.00060080003001
Abstract

Nervous phenomena in influenza are very common, but if we are to judge from the cases reported in the literature, meningitis due to Bacillus influenzæ alone is uncommon.

Cohoe1 in 1909 reviewed the cases that had been reported up to that time and added one case of his own. He was able to collect reports of twenty-four cases in which the diagnosis was based on bacteriological findings. Fifty-six per cent. of these cases occurred in children under 1 year of age. Eighty-five per cent. of the patients in Cohoe's review died; most of the cases came to autopsy. During the past two years several new cases have been reported.2

The gross changes in the central nervous system of patients dying from influenzal meningitis have shown great variation in their situation, extent and character. In most cases the lesions are confined to the tissues of the meninges but the

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