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Article
November 1911

OBSERVATIONS ON THE HEMOLYTIC SKIN TEST FOR CANCER

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1911;VIII(5):621-629. doi:10.1001/archinte.1911.00060110067006
Abstract

In February, 1910, appeared an article by Elsberg, Neuhof and Geist1 describing a skin reaction in carcinoma from the subcutaneous injection of human red blood-cells. The results which they obtained were so remarkable that, were they correct, we should have probably the most valuable test yet discovered for the diagnosis of carcinoma. The test, in brief, consists in the subcutaneous injection of 5 minims of a 20 per cent. suspension of washed human red cells into the flexor surface of the forearm of the individual suspected of having cancer. A positive reaction consisted in the appearance within six hours of a "somewhat irregular oval area with a well-defined margin measuring from 1 by 2 cm. to 3 by 5 cm. The margin is often surrounded by a whitish areola. The color of the lesion varies from a brownish-red to a maroon with, rarely, a bluish tinge. The lesion is

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