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Article
May 1913

ACTIVE HYPEREMIA FOLLOWING LOCAL EXPOSURE TO COLD

Author Affiliations

ANN ARBOR

From the Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1913;XI(5):507-511. doi:10.1001/archinte.1913.00060290041004
Abstract

It is well known that thermic stimuli exert a powerful influence on the local blood-vessels. In our experience, the application of cold water has invariably slowed the current of blood through the arm and this has been commonly followed by some constriction of the vessels even after the temperature of the water has been raised,1 or after the arm has been withdrawn from the cold water. In the patient, whose history follows, a marked vascular dilatation followed the exposure of the arm to moderately cold water. This phenomenon, which was evidently associated with the symptoms present in this patient, is unusual if not pathological. It is related on the one hand to milder degrees of frost-bite and chilblain, and on the other to a disturbed vasomotor control at the surface of the body.

History.—Mr. E. C., 19 years old, entered the University Hospital Nov. 20, 1912, complaining

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