[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
December 1913

AGGLUTINABILITY OF BLOOD AND AGAR STRAINS OF THE TYPHOID BACILLUS: STUDIES IN TYPHOID IMMUNIZATION. II

Author Affiliations

BERKELEY, CAL.

From the Hearst Laboratory of Pathology and Bacteriology, University of California.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1913;XII(6):621-627. doi:10.1001/archinte.1913.00070060013002
Abstract

The growth of the typhoid bacillus on an agar-medium containing 10 per cent. defibrinated rabbit blood, which we have found of advantage in our experiments, differs in certain respects from the growth on plain agar. We have already noted that the blood-agar cultures are more abundant. A concrete example of the amount of growth produced on each medium may be drawn from certain of our vaccine preparations to be more fully described later. To produce growths of Bacillus typhosus for immunizing vaccines we inoculate one-quart Blake bottles containing 100 c.c. of medium with a few cubic centimeters of a twenty-four-hour bouillon-culture of the organism. In one experiment nine Blake bottles of 2 per cent. agar were inoculated with a plain bouillon-culture of B. typhosus No. 3; at the same time, nine Blake bottles of 10 per cent, blood-agar were inoculated with a blood-bouillon culture of B. typhosus No.

×