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Article
May 1917

CLINICAL CALORIMETRY: TWENTIETH PAPER THE EFFECT OF CAFFEIN ON THE HEAT PRODUCTION

Author Affiliations

BOSTON; WITH THE TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE OF G. F. SODERSTROM NEW YORK

From the Russell Sage Institute of Pathology, in affiliation with the Second Medical Division, Bellevue Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1917;XIX(5_II):832-839. doi:10.1001/archinte.1917.00080250011002
Abstract

The object of this research was to determine the effect of a single large dose of caffein on the respiratory metabolism of normal individuals.

The earliest work on the effect of this drug on the gaseous exchange, so far as we have been able to discover, was that of Hoppe1 in 1857. He found some increase in the carbon dioxid output after taking caffein, but the conditions of his experiments are open to criticism. He was followed two years later by Smith2 who studied in a masterly way nearly every aspect of respiration, including the effect of tea, coffee, etc. His technic, so far as one can judge from the description, was excellent. His apparatus was of the open circuit type, the subject breathing through a mask and valves. The inspired air went first through a dry meter and the expired air first through a Woulff bottle,

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