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Article
June 1917

THE REACTION OF THE CEREBROSPINAL FLUID: PRELIMINARY REPORT ON HYDROGEN-ION CONCENTRATION AS DETERMINED BY THE COLORIMETRIC METHOD

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1917;XIX(6):1085-1096. doi:10.1001/archinte.1917.00080260128010
Abstract

The chemical and physical constitution of the cerebrospinal fluid does not furnish any basis for the conception that the reaction of this fluid might be different from that of the blood. The inorganic components,1 chiefly chlorids, phosphates, and carbonates, occur in almost identical amounts in both the blood serum and cerebrospinal fluid. The organic constituents2 vary considerably, but are generally less in amount than similar substances in the blood, and the presence of amphoteric amino-acids and proteins would tend to preserve a neutral reaction in this fluid, as emphasized by Robertson.3 The quantities of these substances, however, do not indicate their influence on the reaction of the fluids in which they occur. Their molecular concentration and ionic dissociation are the important factors. Even the physical properties are approximately the same in both the spinal fluid and blood serum. As measured by cryoscopy, the blood serum

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