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Article
December 1915

AN OXYDASE REACTION ON BLOOD SMEARS: A VALUABLE TEST IN THE IDENTIFICATION OF WHITE BLOOD CELLS OF UNCERTAIN ORIGIN

Author Affiliations

Resident Medical House Officer The Johns Hopkins Hospital; BALTIMORE

From The Clinical Laboratory of the Medical Clinic of The Johns Hopkins Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1915;XVI(6):1067-1072. doi:10.1001/archinte.1915.00080060179013
Abstract

In view of the uncertainty that exists as to the origin and status of many white cells of the blood and the difficulty in differentiating between some cells of myeloid and lymphoid origin such as the Naegeli myeloblast and the pathological lymphocyte, any procedure that affords additional information on this subject is of value. The demonstration of the content of any cell in oxydase ferments affords a biological reaction that is of great help, inasmuch as it has been shown that cells of myeloid origin contain such ferments and those of lymphoid origin do not. This difference was first definitely noted by Meyer1 in 1903, who, following on the observation of Brandenburg2 in 1900, that the blood in myeloid leukemia frequently gave a positive guaiac reaction without the presence of peroxid or turpentine, found that with this test granules of oxydase ferment could be demonstrated in

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