[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
September 1917

AURICULAR FLUTTER: A CONSIDERATION OF SOME PROBLEMS ARISING IN THE STUDY OF A CASE, AND OF THE LITERATURE

Author Affiliations

PITTSBURGH; ST. LOUIS

From the Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1917;XX(3):409-432. doi:10.1001/archinte.1917.00090030094006
Abstract

Auricular flutter is that condition in which the auricles contract rhythmically and coordinately at a greatly accelerated rate, the lower limit of which has been arbitrarily placed by Lewis1 at 200. The rate of the ventricles is usually slower than that of the auricles. This difference in rate is due to the fact that the ventricles fail to respond to every impulse originating in the auricles.

The term "auricular flutter" was first applied clinically by Jolly and Ritchie2 in 1911; but the condition had been previously described as occurring in both humans3 and animals.4 Before the term was generally accepted, we find auricular flutter referred to as "jugular embryocardia," "auricular tachysystole," "auricular tachycardia," and "auricular tachyrhythmia."5 From the time that this disturbance in mechanism had been first recorded, until 1914, when Ritchie published his book, fifty-three cases, including those of Ritchie, had been reported. This fact, especially in view of

×