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Article
November 1917

AMYOTONIA CONGENITA OF OPPENHEIM: A REPORT OF SIX CASES, WITH A FULL REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1917;XX(5):657-700. doi:10.1001/archinte.1917.00090050018002
Abstract

INTRODUCTION  In 1900, Oppenheim1 called attention to a syndrome which has since been designated as "Oppenheim's Disease."He had repeatedly observed, in the first months of infancy, and during the first and second years of life, a disease with which he was not acquainted and one of which he could find no mention in the literature.In this disease he observed immobility of the whole body, or of certain parts of the body, especially of the lower extremities; the parts affected were flaccid; the main symptom was the striking flaccidity. hypotonia or atony of the muscles, which was associated with complete loss or with very much diminished tendon reflexes. In most cases only the legs were affected; in one 8-month-old infant the muscles of the back and the neck were also affected; the child could not sit up nor support its head upright. The muscles of the back and the

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