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Article
December 1917

OBSERVATIONS ON ACUTE MERCURIC CHLORID NEPHROSIS: WITH A REPORT OF TWO CASES

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1917;XX(6):919-930. doi:10.1001/archinte.1917.00090060093009
Abstract

In a recent classification of renal disease1 the kidney lesion induced by heavy metal poisoning is classed as a nephrosis on account of the fact that there is degeneration of the tubule cells without hematuria or rise in blood pressure. Certain other factors, however, make it advisable to class these cases as "special" nephroses, thus recognizing the fact that they do not exactly parallel the types of renal disease caused either by bacteria or by their toxins. Seen in man, they form the connecting link between the ordinary clinical types of Bright's disease and the varieties produced by experimental methods. The anatomic lesion in these cases is well described by Heineke,2 and consists in an acute degeneration of the tubule cells, principally of the proximal convoluted tubules, caused by the mercury in process of excretion through these cells. Very early there occur attempts at regeneration, with replacement of the degenerated

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