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Article
March 1918

CONTRIBUTION TO THE PHYSIOLOGY OF THE STOMACH: XLVI. GASTRIC SECRETION DURING FEVER

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the Hull Physiological Laboratory of the University of Chicago.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1918;XXI(3):354-365. doi:10.1001/archinte.1918.00020010046005
Abstract

Beaumont1 was first to observe that

In febrile diathesis or predisposition from whatever cause . . . the villous coat becomes red and dry, at other times pale and moist and loses its smooth and healthy appearance; the secretions become greatly vitiated, greatly diminished, or entirely suppressed, and mucous coat scarcely perceptible, the follicles flat and flaccid, with secretions insufficient to protect the nervous papillae . . . When there are corresponding symptoms of disease, as dryness of the mouth, thirst, accelerated pulse, etc., no gastric juice can be extracted, not even on the application of alimentary stimulus. Drinks received are immediately absorbed or otherwise disposed of, none remaining in the stomach ten minutes after being swallowed. Food taken in this condition of the stomach remains undigested for twenty-four to forty-eight hours or more, increasing the derangement of the whole alimentary canal and aggravating the general symptoms of disease.

Clinical and experimental evidence confirms these

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