Weight Reduction and Increased Physical Activity to Prevent the Progression of Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A 4-Year Observational Postintervention Follow-up of a Randomized Clinical Trial | Lifestyle Behaviors | JAMA Internal Medicine | JAMA Network
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Research Letter
May 27, 2013

Weight Reduction and Increased Physical Activity to Prevent the Progression of Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A 4-Year Observational Postintervention Follow-up of a Randomized Clinical Trial

Author Affiliations

Author Affiliations: Oivauni Sleep Clinic, Kuopio, Finland (Dr H. Tuomilehto); Department of Otorhinolaryngology (Dr Seppä) and Clinical Research Center (Drs Uusitupa and Gylling), Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland; Institute of Clinical Medicine (Dr Seppä) and Department of Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, (Drs Uusitupa and Gylling), University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio; Center for Vascular Prevention, Danube-University Krems, Krems, Austria (Dr J. Tuomilehto); South Ostrobothnia Central Hospital, Seinäjoki, Finland (Dr J. Tuomilehto); and Department of Medicine, Division of Internal Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland (Dr Gylling).

JAMA Intern Med. 2013;173(10):930-932. doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2013.389

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has become a major health burden in affluent populations. It is a chronic, progressive disease, and it is well documented that severe OSA is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.1-3 Obesity is the most important risk factor for OSA; in fact, most patients with OSA are obese.4 Weight reduction has been shown to improve OSA or even cure it.5,6 However, whether beneficial changes related to weight loss are maintained after stopping the active lifestyle intervention, and, thus, the progression of OSA prevented, is not known. The aim of the study was to assess the long-term efficacy of a lifestyle intervention based on weight reduction, healthy diet, and physical activity during a 4-year postintervention follow-up in people with OSA who originally participated in a 1-year randomized, clinical lifestyle intervention trial.5

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