No Increase in Risk of Microscopic Hematuria With Aspirin Use by Asymptomatic Healthy People | Hematology | JAMA Internal Medicine | JAMA Network
[Skip to Navigation]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 35.170.64.36. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
Research Letter
June 24, 2013

No Increase in Risk of Microscopic Hematuria With Aspirin Use by Asymptomatic Healthy People

Author Affiliations

Author Affiliations: Department of Urology, College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea (Drs Jeong, S. Lee, Byun, and S. E. Lee); and Department of Urology (Drs Jeong, S. Lee, Byun, and S. E. Lee), Health Promotion Center (Dr D. H. Lee), and Department of Internal Medicine (Dr D. H. Lee), Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, Korea.

JAMA Intern Med. 2013;173(12):1145-1146. doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2013.567

The daily use of aspirin in low doses (75-325 mg) is a well-known preventive therapy for cardiovascular disease.1 Approximately 35% of adults in the United States are estimated to take aspirin regularly for this purpose.2 Furthermore, the regular use of aspirin seems to reduce the risk of several types of cancer and distant metastasis.3,4 However, aspirin can increase the risk of bleeding, especially risk for bleeding of the gastrointestinal tract and hemorrhagic stroke.5,6 Nevertheless, the correlation between the daily use of low-dose aspirin and microscopic hematuria in the asymptomatic general population is unknown. We evaluated whether the daily use of aspirin increases the risk of hematuria in a large sample of healthy individuals.

×