[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 34.238.248.103. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Original Investigation
June 24, 2013

Estimating Quality of Life in Acute Venous Thrombosis

Author Affiliations

Author Affiliations: Departments of Medicine (Drs Hogg, Carrier, Forgie, and Wells and Ms Kimpton) and Epidemiology and Community Medicine (Dr Coyle), University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.

JAMA Intern Med. 2013;173(12):1067-1072. doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2013.563
Abstract

Importance Future funding for new treatments in venous thromboembolism will be guided by cost-utility analyses. There is little available information on the utility of acute venous thromboembolism, limiting the validity of economic analyses.

Objective To measure the quality of life in the health states relating to thromboembolism cost-utility analyses.

Design A prospective cohort study.

Setting A single-center, university-affiliated thrombosis clinic.

Participants Two hundred sixteen thrombosis clinic patients with a history of lower limb deep vein thrombosis (DVT) or pulmonary embolism (PE).

Exposures Participants consented to take a standard gamble interview. Each participant rated the quality of life in acute DVT, acute PE, and bleeding complication health states.

Main Outcomes and Measures The standard gamble measured quality of life (utility value) for acute DVT, acute PE, major intracranial bleeding event, minor intracranial bleeding event, and gastrointestinal bleeding event.

Results Two hundred fifteen responses were included in the analysis. Twenty-six percent had experienced both PE and DVT; 54%, DVT alone; and 20%, PE alone. Forty-two percent had experienced more than 1 episode of thrombosis, and 23% had had cancer-associated thrombosis. We found the median utility for acute DVT was 0.81 (interquartile range [IQR], 0.55-0.94); acute PE, 0.75 (IQR, 0.45-0.91); major intracranial bleeding event, 0.15 (IQR, 0.00-0.65); minor intracranial bleeding event, 0.75 (IQR, 0.55-0.92); and gastrointestinal bleeding event, 0.65 (IQR, 0.15-0.86). The median length of symptoms for DVT or PE was 1 week (IQR, <1-3 weeks).

Conclusions and Relevance To our knowledge, this is the largest published study on utilities in which the participants had personal experience of venous thromboembolism. We present unique information for economic analyses but have also identified future challenges for research in this area. Our summary results differ from those previously published, and we found wide variation in individual responses.

×