Baseline Adherence to the Mediterranean Diet and Major Cardiovascular Events: Prevención con Dieta Mediterránea Trial | Cardiology | JAMA Internal Medicine | JAMA Network
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Research Letter
October 2014

Baseline Adherence to the Mediterranean Diet and Major Cardiovascular Events: Prevención con Dieta Mediterránea Trial

Author Affiliations
  • 1Cardiovascular Risk and Nutrition Research Group, Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute, Barcelona, Spain
  • 2Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Epidemiología y Salud Pública, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid, Spain
  • 3Human Nutrition Department, Sant Joan Hospital, Institut Rovira i Virgili, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Reus, Spain
  • 4Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutrición, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid, Spain
  • 5Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, University of Navarra, Pamplona, Spain
  • 6Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, University of Valencia, Valencia, Spain
  • 7Department of Internal Medicine, Hospital Clinic, Institut d’Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain
  • 8Lipid Clinic, Department of Endocrinology and Nutrition, Hospital Clinic, Institut d’Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain
JAMA Intern Med. 2014;174(10):1690-1692. doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2014.3463

Lifestyle modification, particularly dietary changes, is the cornerstone of population-based strategies for cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention.1 Recently the Prevención con Dieta Mediterránea (PREDIMED) study,2 a 5-year randomized primary prevention trial (isrctn.org Identifier: ISRCTN35739639), showed a 30% reduction in incident CVD with Mediterranean diet (MeDiet) intervention in comparison with a control diet. At quarterly visits throughout the study, a validated 14-item MeDiet screening tool (Table 1) was used to assess conformity with this dietary pattern.3

Close monitoring of adherence to dietary instructions for CVD prevention is difficult in the clinical setting. Short dietary assessment tools, such as the PREDIMED screener, are desirable to identify individuals in need of dietary counseling. Given that there is little information on the association of diet scores with disease outcomes in longitudinal studies, we investigated whether the baseline 14-point MeDiet score was related to incident CVD in the PREDIMED cohort.

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