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Original Investigation
May 11, 1998

Sumatriptan Injection Reduces Productivity Loss During a Migraine Attack: Results of a Double-blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial

Author Affiliations

From the Headache Care Center, Springfield, Mo (Dr Cady), and Glaxo Wellcome Research Institute, Research Triangle Park, NC (Drs Jhingran and O'Quinn and Ms Pait). Dr Ryan is in private practice in St Louis, Mo.

Arch Intern Med. 1998;158(9):1013-1018. doi:10.1001/archinte.158.9.1013
Abstract

Objective  To evaluate the impact of sumatriptan succinate injection compared with placebo on productivity loss during a migraine attack in the workplace.

Design  Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group clinical trial.

Setting  Fifteen clinical centers in the United States.

Patients  One hundred thirty-five patients 18 years and older diagnosed as having migraine according to International Headache Society criteria.

Interventions  Patients self-administered sumatriptan injection (6 mg) or matching placebo to treat a moderate or severe migraine occurring within the first 4 hours of a minimum 8-hour work shift.

Main Outcome Measures  Mean productivity loss 2 hours after dosing and across the work shift; percentages of patients returning to normal work performance within 2 hours after dosing and across the work shift; percentages of patients experiencing headache relief (reduction of moderate or severe predose pain to mild or no pain) 1 and 2 hours after dosing.

Results  Mean productivity loss was significantly (P≤.002) lower in the sumatriptan group compared with the placebo group both during the 2-hour postdose period (sumatriptan, 39 minutes; placebo, 54 minutes) and across the work shift (sumatriptan, 86 minutes; placebo, 168 minutes). Significantly (P<.001) greater percentages of patients in the sumatriptan group compared with the placebo group returned to normal work performance by 2 hours after dosing (sumatriptan, 52%; placebo, 9%) and across the work shift (sumatriptan, 66%; placebo, 18%). Significantly (P≤.001) greater percentages of patients in the sumatriptan group compared with the placebo group experienced headache relief 1 hour after dosing (sumatriptan, 69%; placebo, 18%) and 2 hours after dosing (sumatriptan, 79%; placebo, 32%).

Conclusion  Sumatriptan reduced migraine-associated productivity loss during a minimum 8-hour work shift by approximately 50% compared with placebo and alleviated headache in more than three fourths of patients.

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