Differences in Prostate-Specific Antigen Testing Among Urologists and Primary Care Physicians Following the 2012 USPSTF Recommendations | Cancer Biomarkers | JAMA Internal Medicine | JAMA Network
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    1 Comment for this article
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    Urologists have the most knowledge and experience curing prostate cancer
    David L. Keller, MD | Independent Internist
    As a primary-care internist, my job is often to identify the specialist who has the most knowledge and experience in dealing with my patient's problem. When it comes to early detection and definitive cure of prostate cancer, that specialist is a urologist. The 2 controlled studies relied on by the USPSTF to recommend against PSA screening were poorly designed and badly executed, as I have detailed elsewhere. Only PSA screening can account for the 40% drop in prostate cancer deaths seen since its widespread use. Those internists who are adopting the no-PSA-test policy may be under duress by capitated employers, who do not want to have to pay for robotic prostatectomies or conformal radiation to treat prostate cancer. Let these internists answer to their consciences, their state Medical Boards and their patients' plaintiff attorneys if time proves the USPSTF wrong. Meanwhile, I will continue to test PSA on myself and other eligible men. Information cannot harm anyone, only its misuse can.
    CONFLICT OF INTEREST: None Reported
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    Research Letter
    April 2016

    Differences in Prostate-Specific Antigen Testing Among Urologists and Primary Care Physicians Following the 2012 USPSTF Recommendations

    Author Affiliations
    • 1Center for Surgery and Public Health, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts
    • 2Division of Urological Surgery, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts
    JAMA Intern Med. 2016;176(4):546-547. doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2015.7901
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