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Figure 1.  Study Design
Study Design

RRT indicates renal replacement therapy.

Figure 2.  Cumulative ESRD Rate During Follow-up
Cumulative ESRD Rate During Follow-up

ESRD indicates end-stage renal disease.

Table 1.  Baseline Characteristics of Participants Examined, 1967-2013
Baseline Characteristics of Participants Examined, 1967-2013
Table 2.  Duration of Follow-up and Age at Diagnosis of End-stage Renal Disease
Duration of Follow-up and Age at Diagnosis of End-stage Renal Disease
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Mancia  G, Fagard  R, Narkiewicz  K,  et al.  2013 ESH/ESC guidelines for the management of arterial hypertension: The Task Force for the management of arterial hypertension of the European Society of Hypertension (ESH) and of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).  Eur Heart J. 2013;34(28):2159-2219. doi:10.1093/eurheartj/eht151PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
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Gray  L, Lee  IM, Sesso  HD, Batty  GD.  Blood pressure in early adulthood, hypertension in middle age, and future cardiovascular disease mortality: HAHS (Harvard Alumni Health Study).  J Am Coll Cardiol. 2011;58(23):2396-2403. doi:10.1016/j.jacc.2011.07.045PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
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Falkstedt  D, Koupil  I, Hemmingsson  T.  Blood pressure in late adolescence and early incidence of coronary heart disease and stroke in the Swedish 1969 conscription cohort.  J Hypertens. 2008;26(7):1313-1320. doi:10.1097/HJH.0b013e3282ffb17ePubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
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Miura  K, Daviglus  ML, Dyer  AR,  et al.  Relationship of blood pressure to 25-year mortality due to coronary heart disease, cardiovascular diseases, and all causes in young adult men: the Chicago Heart Association Detection Project in Industry.  Arch Intern Med. 2001;161(12):1501-1508. doi:10.1001/archinte.161.12.1501PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
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Leiba  A, Twig  G, Levine  H,  et al.  Hypertension in late adolescence and cardiovascular mortality in midlife: a cohort study of 2.3 million 16- to 19-year-old examinees.  Pediatr Nephrol. 2016;31(3):485-492. doi:10.1007/s00467-015-3240-1PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
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Ortiz  A, Covic  A, Fliser  D,  et al; Board of the EURECA-m Working Group of ERA-EDTA.  Epidemiology, contributors to, and clinical trials of mortality risk in chronic kidney failure.  Lancet. 2014;383(9931):1831-1843. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(14)60384-6PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
11.
Jha  V, Garcia-Garcia  G, Iseki  K,  et al.  Chronic kidney disease: global dimension and perspectives.  Lancet. 2013;382(9888):260-272.PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
12.
Whelton  PK, Klag  MJ.  Hypertension as a risk factor for renal disease. Review of clinical and epidemiological evidence.  Hypertension. 1989;13(5)(suppl):I19-I27.PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
13.
Jalal  DI, Nolan  CR, Schrier  RW. The kidney in hypertension. In: Schrier  RW.  Renal and Electrolyte Disorders. 8th ed. Philadelphia: Wolters Kluwer; 2017:297-298.
14.
Sorof  J, Daniels  S.  Obesity hypertension in children: a problem of epidemic proportions.  Hypertension. 2002;40(4):441-447.PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
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Moyer  VA; U.S. Preventive Services Task Force.  Screening for primary hypertension in children and adolescents: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement.  Pediatrics. 2013;132(5):907-914. doi:10.1542/peds.2013-2864PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
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McNiece  KL, Poffenbarger  TS, Turner  JL, Franco  KD, Sorof  JM, Portman  RJ.  Prevalence of hypertension and pre-hypertension among adolescents.  J Pediatr. 2007;150(6):640-644, 644.e1.PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
17.
Sundin  P-O, Udumyan  R, Sjöström  P, Montgomery  S.  Predictors in adolescence of ESRD in middle-aged men.  Am J Kidney Dis. 2014;64(5):723-729. doi:10.1053/j.ajkd.2014.06.019PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
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Silverwood  RJ, Pierce  M, Hardy  R,  et al; National Survey of Health and Development Scientific and Data Collection Teams.  Early-life overweight trajectory and CKD in the 1946 British birth cohort study.  Am J Kidney Dis. 2013;62(2):276-284. doi:10.1053/j.ajkd.2013.03.032PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
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Vivante  A, Golan  E, Tzur  D,  et al.  Body mass index in 1.2 million adolescents and risk for end-stage renal disease.  Arch Intern Med. 2012;172(21):1644-1650.PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
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Kelly  RK, Magnussen  CG, Sabin  MA, Cheung  M, Juonala  M.  Development of hypertension in overweight adolescents: a review.  Adolesc Health Med Ther. 2015;6:171-187. doi:10.2147/ AHMT.S55837PubMedGoogle Scholar
21.
Vivante  A, Afek  A, Frenkel-Nir  Y,  et al.  Persistent asymptomatic isolated microscopic hematuria in Israeli adolescents and young adults and risk for end-stage renal disease.  JAMA. 2011;306(7):729-736. doi:10.1001/jama.2011.1141PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
22.
Zarif  L, Covic  A, Iyengar  S, Sehgal  AR, Sedor  JR, Schelling  JR.  Inaccuracy of clinical phenotyping parameters for hypertensive nephrosclerosis.  Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2000;15(11):1801-1807. doi:10.1093/ndt/15.11.1801PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
23.
Marcantoni  C, Ma  L-J, Federspiel  C, Fogo  AB.  Hypertensive nephrosclerosis in African Americans versus Caucasians.  Kidney Int. 2002;62(1):172-180.PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
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Kincaid-Smith  P.  Hypothesis: obesity and the insulin resistance syndrome play a major role in end-stage renal failure attributed to hypertension and labelled ‘hypertensive nephrosclerosis’.  J Hypertens. 2004;22(6):1051-1055. doi:10.1097/00004872-200406000-00001PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
25.
Hsu  CY.  Does non-malignant hypertension cause renal insufficiency? evidence-based perspective.  Curr Opin Nephrol Hypertens. 2002;11(3):267-272.PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
26.
Parsa  A, Kao  WHL, Xie  D,  et al; AASK Study Investigators; CRIC Study Investigators.  APOL1 risk variants, race, and progression of chronic kidney disease.  N Engl J Med. 2013;369(23):2183-2196. doi:10.1056/NEJMoa1310345PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
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Kouidi  E, Fahadidou-Tsiligiroglou  A, Tassoulas  E, Deligiannis  A, Coats  A.  White coat hypertension detected during screening of male adolescent athletes.  Am J Hypertens. 1999;12(2 Pt 1):223-226. doi:10.1016/S0895-7061(98)00186-1PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
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Flynn  JT.  Evaluation and management of hypertension in childhood.  Prog Pediatr Cardiol. 2001;12(2):177-188. doi:10.1016/S1058-9813(00)00071-0PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
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    Original Investigation
    February 25, 2019

    Association of Adolescent Hypertension With Future End-stage Renal Disease

    Author Affiliations
    • 1Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Assuta Ashdod Academic Medical Center, Ben Gurion University, Beer Sheva, Israel
    • 2IDF Medical Corps, Tel Hashomer, Ramat Gan, Israel
    • 3Department of Medicine, Mount Auburn Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
    • 4Internal Medicine D and Hypertension Unit, The Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel
    • 5Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel
    • 6Department of Physiology and Cell Biology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben Gurion University, Beer Sheva, Israel
    • 7Assuta Medical Center, Tel Aviv, Israel
    • 8Israel Center for Disease Control, Israel Ministry of Health, Tel Hashomer, Israel
    JAMA Intern Med. 2019;179(4):517-523. doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.7632
    Key Points

    Question  Is established hypertension among otherwise healthy adolescents associated with increased risk for future end-stage renal disease?

    Findings  In this cohort study of 2.65 million adolescent candidates for military service in Israel, a very small percentage of participants (0.3%) had a well-established hypertension diagnosis and end-stage renal disease developed in some participants after an extensive period.

    Meaning  Well-established hypertension during adolescence appears to double the risk for future end-stage renal disease, irrespective of overweight condition or severity of hypertension.

    Abstract

    Importance  Hypertension is a leading risk factor of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The role of nonmalignant hypertension as the sole initiating factor of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in non–African American populations has recently been questioned.

    Objective  To investigate the association between hypertension and future ESRD in otherwise healthy adolescents.

    Design, Setting, and Participants  This retrospective cohort study examined the data of 16- to 19-year-old healthy candidates for military service in the Israel Defense Forces between January 1, 1967, and December 31, 2013. Data were obtained from the central conscription registry of the Israel Defense Forces and the ESRD registry of the Israel Ministry of Health. Participants underwent a comprehensive medical assessment prior to their military service. Individuals with evidence of renal damage or kidney-related risk factors were excluded. The data analysis was conducted from February 12, 2017, to October 16, 2018.

    Main Outcomes and Measures  End-stage renal disease as recorded by the Israeli ESRD registry, including hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis, renal transplant diagnosed between January 1, 1990, and December 31, 2014.

    Results  The cohort included 2 658 238 adolescents (1 596 709 [60.1%] male with a mean [SD] age of 17.4 [0.5] years), of whom 7997 (0.3%) had an established hypertension diagnosis. Half of the individuals in the hypertensive group were overweight (1559 [20.1%]) or obese (2243 [28.9%]), and most (7235 [90.5%]) were male. During a median follow-up of 19.6 years (52 287 945 person-years), 2189 individuals developed ESRD, with an incidence rate of 3.9 per 100 000 person-years. Adolescent hypertension was found to be associated with future ESRD (crude hazard ratio [HR], 5.07; 95% CI, 3.73-6.88). In a multivariable model adjusted for sex, age, years of education, body mass index, and other sociodemographic variables, the HR was 1.98 (95% CI, 1.42-2.77). When excluding participants with severe hypertension, the association with ESRD remained statistically significant (HR, 1.93; 95% CI, 1.37-2.70). In the subanalysis of nonoverweight adolescents, the association between hypertension and ESRD was statistically significant as well (HR, 2.11; 95% CI, 1.05-4.24).

    Conclusions and Relevance  Hypertension appears to be associated with a doubling of the risk of future ESRD in an otherwise healthy adolescent population.

    Introduction

    Hypertension is the most important contributor to the burden of disease and the leading cause of mortality worldwide, estimated to be responsible for almost 13% of all deaths.1-3 Although hypertension is much more common in adults and elderly people, it has increasingly been observed in adolescents and young adults during the past 30 years.4,5 Studies have shown that hypertension, when manifested in this age group, is a risk factor for all-cause mortality, specifically for cardiovascular mortality and, in some other studies, cerebrovascular mortality.6-9

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) is a major cause of mortality as well as a leading risk factor for other fatal diseases, including cardiovascular disease. Worldwide, the number of individuals with ESRD in 2010 was estimated at 5 to 10 million and is expected to rise, owing to the increasing prevalence of hypertension, diabetes, population aging, and renal replacement therapies that prolong the lives of patients with ESRD.10 Hypertension in adulthood has been recognized as 1 of the 2 leading causes of ESRD, responsible for more than 25% of cases, second only to diabetes (responsible for 44%), in the United States.11 However, the role of nonmalignant hypertension as the sole initiating factor of ESRD in non–African American populations is debatable at present.12,13 In this study, we investigated whether well-established essential hypertension, presenting between ages 16 and 19 years without concurrent kidney morbidities, is a substantial initiating risk factor for future ESRD.

    Methods
    Databases and Study Population

    We conducted a large population-based retrospective cohort study that included all eligible adolescents, males and females, between 16 and 19 years of age who were called up to the Israel Defense Forces regional recruitment centers for a medical health assessment approximately 1 year prior to their conscription into mandatory military service. The study was approved by the Israel Defense Forces Medical Corps Institutional Review Board, which waived the requirement for informed consent because the data used were obtained from medical records without patient participation. The data analysis was conducted from February 12, 2017, to October 16, 2018.

    Arab people, Jewish Orthodox females, and Jewish ultra-Orthodox males do not serve in the Israeli army and therefore were not included in this study. All candidates for military service between January 1, 1967, and December 31, 2013, were examined. The cohort was created by linking the data obtained from the central conscription registry of the Israel Defense Forces with the data from ESRD registry of the Israel Ministry of Health. Excluded were those who were deceased before the initiation of the ESRD registry (January 1, 1990). Also excluded were individuals who, on recruitment, received a diagnosis other than hypertension that is believed to affect renal function such as diabetes, systemic lupus erythematosus, Familial Mediterranean Fever, all types of vasculitis, persistent hematuria (including microhematuria), proteinuria, chronic nephrolithiasis, recurrent urinary tract infection, cystic kidney disease, acute kidney injury and chronic kidney disease, congenital and acquired anomalies of the kidney, and present and resolved glomerulonephritis (Figure 1). Individuals who already received an ESRD diagnosis at the time of the medical examination were also excluded from the study.

    Data Collection at the Regional Recruitment Centers

    As part of their medical assessment at the regional recruitment center, all individuals were required to fill out a medical status form and provide a summary of their medical status furnished by their primary care physician. During the assessment, a detailed medical history was taken and a physical examination was performed by a trained physician. In addition, height and weight were measured, and mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP) (based on the measurement acquired while sitting) were recorded. Urinalysis was performed using a urine dipstick. If any information was missing or abnormal during the assessment, the individuals were referred for further evaluation.

    When the systolic and diastolic BP values were higher than 140/90 mm Hg, the individuals were referred to their primary care physician for an additional 10 consecutive BP measurements over a period of at least 3 weeks. If the urinalysis results were abnormal, additional tests such as a 24-hour urine collection were performed and the individual was further examined by a nephrologist. As with other medical diagnoses, the diagnosis of essential hypertension was determined only after the Israel Defense Forces medical board had completed the evaluations needed to render the diagnosis and assign a relevant code. The final diagnosis of hypertension was determined when the mean of the outpatient BP measurements was higher than 140/90 mm Hg and at least 50% of these measurements were above this level. All individuals with hypertension underwent a full evaluation to exclude secondary hypertension. Severe hypertension was defined when the mean of 10 measurements taken in the outpatient clinic was higher than 160/100 mm Hg and at least 50% of the measurements were above this level or when left ventricular hypertrophy or grade 2 retinopathy was present. Individuals with severe hypertension were released from military service. If a diagnosis of essential hypertension was verified, the individual received a code that represented the diagnosis and determined their classification in the army. Individuals with diagnosis codes that represented essential hypertension composed the hypertensive group.

    In addition to the medical evaluation at the recruitment center, all candidates for military service completed a psychometric examination and were interviewed with regard to years of education, place of residence, and country of origin. Country of origin refers to the country of the person’s birth or, in cases of Israel born, the father’s or paternal grandfather’s country of origin; the mother's country of origin was unavailable in this cohort.

    Outcome

    The primary outcome of this study was ESRD as recorded by the Israeli ESRD registry. The registry is a national administrative database founded in 1990 and maintained by the Israel Center for Disease Control. All nephrology dialysis units in Israel are obligated to report new patients undergoing renal replacement therapy (ie, hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis, and renal transplant) to the Israel Center for Disease Control. The database contains demographic data, type of renal replacement therapy, and ESRD onset date (the date of renal replacement therapy initiation). All ESRD cases from January 1, 1990, to December 31, 2014, were included in this study.

    Statistical Analysis

    The SPSS software, version 23 (IBM), was used to conduct an unadjusted survival analysis to determine the cumulative incidence of ESRD. The Cox proportional hazards regression models estimated the crude hazard ratio (HR) and 95% CI for ESRD. Follow-up began on the day of the original examination at the recruitment center and concluded when data were conveyed to the ESRD registry, when death had occurred, or on December 31, 2014, whichever came first.

    We included in the multivariable model the variables that are known from previous studies to have an association with the outcome and variables that were associated with the primary outcome in the univariate analyses. The final multivariable model was adjusted for the following variables: sex, age at the medical examination, year of birth, country of origin (ie, father’s or paternal grandfather’s country of birth), and socioeconomic status divided into 3 groups according to place of residence (using a scale provided by the Israel Central Bureau of Statistics). Educational status was divided into 4 groups (9, 10, 11, or 12 or more years of education). Body mass index (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared) for age was divided into 4 percentile groups, as defined by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for teenagers: underweight (<5% percentile), normal weight (5%-85% percentile), overweight (85%-95% percentile), and obese (>95% percentile).

    To overcome the lack of an ESRD registry between January 1, 1967, and December 31, 1989, and to estimate the possible association between this deficit and our findings, we estimated the rate of ESRD across different ages of the participants who had enrolled in the study between January 1, 1967, and December 31, 2013, and among those who had enrolled between January 1, 1990, and December 31, 2013. An additional subanalysis was performed for various enrollment periods. To minimize the period without ESRD data, we performed a sensitivity analysis of the participants who had enrolled in the study between January 1, 1977, and December 31, 2013. A competing risk analysis for mortality of any cause, for those who were alive at the establishment of the ESRD registry (January 1, 1990), was also performed. We performed a subanalysis of participants with severe hypertension and nonoverweight participants, and we conducted a separate analysis of the overweight and obese participants. Details of these extensive sensitivity analyses are provided in the Supplement.

    Results
    Characteristics

    The final cohort included 2 658 238 individuals, of whom 7997 (0.3%) had a hypertension diagnosis (Figure 1) and 1 596 709 (60.1%) were male with a mean (SD) age of 17.4 (0.5) years. In the hypertensive group (n = 7997), 7235 (90.5%) were male, representing 60.1% (1 596 709) of the general cohort. Nearly half (49.0%) of the individuals in the hypertensive group were overweight (1559 [20.1%]) or obese (2243 [28.9%]) at the time of their examination, compared with the 12.9% of those in the nonhypertensive population (n = 2 650 241) who were either overweight (225 266 [8.8%]) or obese (104 023 [4.1%]). Most (63.7%) of the individuals in the hypertensive group originated from North America and Europe (3335 [42.4%]) as well as the former Soviet Union (1678 [21.3%]), although their percentage (43.7%) in the general cohort was lower (758 776 [29.3%] vs 373 314 [14.4%]). Baseline characteristics of the cohort are shown in Table 1.

    Rates of End-stage Renal Disease

    During a median (interquartile range [IQR]) follow-up of 19.6 (10.4-31.2) years, within a total of 56 287 945 person-years, 2189 cases of ESRD with a crude incidence rate of 3.9 per 100 000 person-years were found among the nonhypertensive group (Table 2). Forty-two individuals (0.5%) who had a diagnosis of established hypertension at conscription later received a diagnosis of ESRD with a crude incidence rate of 20.2 per 100 000 person-years. Figure 2 describes the cumulative ESRD rate during follow-up. The rate of ESRD in individuals younger than 40 years was very low (eFigure 1 in the Supplement).

    In an unadjusted Cox regression model (model 1), established hypertension was found to be associated with a 5-fold increased risk of ESRD (HR, 5.07; 95% CI, 3.73-6.88). In a multivariable model adjusted for year of birth, age at examination at a recruitment center, and sex (model 2), the association was attenuated but still statistically significant (HR, 3.33; 95% CI, 2.45-4.52). In the final multivariable model (model 3), also adjusted for body mass index, country of origin, years of education, and socioeconomic status, hypertension was found to almost double the risk of ESRD (HR, 1.98; 95% CI, 1.42-2.77). In a subanalysis excluding 95 adolescents with a severe hypertension diagnosis, the results of the multivariable analyses were similar to the results found in the entire cohort (HR, 1.93; 95% CI, 1.37-2.70). Additional subanalyses of various periods of enrollment (1977-2013 and 1967-1984) found similar results as findings of the analysis of the entire cohort population.

    The results of the models are described extensively in eTables 1 and 2 and eFigure 2 in the Supplement. In a competing risk analysis, the association between hypertension and ESRD remained the same with an HR of 1.96 (95% CI, 1.40-2.75).

    Sensitivity Analysis
    ESRD in Nonoverweight or Nonobese Participants

    We conducted a sensitivity analysis consisting of only individuals who were not overweight or obese as defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Overall, they comprised 87.1% (n = 2 241 177) of the original cohort. Nine cases (0.2%) of ESRD were observed among the hypertensive group. The unadjusted HR for ESRD was 2.59 (95% CI, 1.34-4.98). In the multivariable model adjusted for all of the above variables, hypertension among individuals was found associated with ESRD (HR, 2.11; 95% CI, 1.05-4.24). Hypertension in overweight and obese individuals was also found to be associated with ESRD, with an adjusted HR of 1.90 (95% CI, 1.29-2.78) (eTables 3 and 4 and eFigure 3 in the Supplement).

    Discussion

    Adolescent hypertension is a public health issue with a growing prevalence, especially in the developed world, which can probably be explained by the increasing rates of overweight condition and obesity among adolescents worldwide as well as by the increasing awareness of hypertension at this age, leading to higher rates of diagnosis.14 However, the potential advantages and harms of essential hypertension screening among asymptomatic children and adolescents are still unclear, as stated by the US Preventive Services Task Force 2013 recommendations.15 The rate of hypertension among the adolescents in this study was lower (0.3%) than the rate previously reported worldwide (1%-5%).15,16 This difference may stem from the study population; that is, we excluded all individuals with morbidities known to be associated with hypertension such as diabetes and present and resolved glomerulonephritis. Moreover, most previous studies based their diagnosis of hypertension on a single BP measurement, whereas we labeled participants as hypertensive only if their established hypertension was confirmed by repeated elevated BP measurements and a thorough evaluation. We found that hypertension was much more prevalent among individuals who originated from or were descendants of European and North American countries, compared with other regions such as Asia and Africa.

    The main finding of this study is that hypertension in late adolescence is associated with an almost 2-fold increased risk for future ESRD. Numerous previous studies have shown that hypertension during adolescence is an independent risk factor for future morbidity and mortality, especially after cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events.6-9 Leiba et al9 demonstrated that adolescents with established hypertension have a 3-fold risk of developing stroke-related mortality in midlife. The Falkstedt et al7 cohort study of Swedish military conscripts found that elevated BP was associated with cardiovascular morbidity. The Gray et al6 study of undergraduate 18-year-old males found that elevated BP was associated with future all-cause death, particularly cardiovascular death. Their study was unique in that their data related to middle-aged hypertension; thus, they used this information in their statistical models. Sundin et al17 found in their study of Swedish late-adolescent male conscripts that hypertension was associated with future ESRD. However, in their study, as well as in most other studies, the diagnosis of hypertension was based on only 1 BP measurement, whereas in this present study, the diagnosis was based on several elevated measurements.

    Obesity during childhood and adolescence has been shown to be an independent risk factor for future ESRD.18,19 Obesity is associated with hypertension. This association was mainly studied in adults; however, in recent years, it has also been observed in adolescents, emphasizing the role of obesity in the growing prevalence of hypertension.14,20 To separate the association between essential hypertension in adolescents and obesity in future ESRD, we performed a subgroup analysis of nonoverweight adolescents as defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Albeit the total number of ESRD cases in nonoverweight participants was much lower, the association remained statistically significant with a nearly 2-fold increased risk (HR, 2.11; 95% CI, 1.05-4.24). This subanalysis suggests that established hypertension in adolescents is independently associated with ESRD (unrelated to obesity).

    A previous study using the same cohort found that persistent asymptomatic isolated microscopic hematuria increased the risk of future ESRD by 18.5-fold.21 Hematuria may suggest an underlying renal disease; therefore, the risk of developing ESRD is very high. In the present study, individuals with hematuria were excluded, and only healthy individuals with hypertension were included. We found that even mild to moderate hypertension doubles the risk of future ESRD. Another previous study showed that overweight condition (HR of 3.00) and obesity (HR of 6.89) were associated with ESRD.19

    The probable risk for adolescents with hypertension to develop ESRD is relatively modest and transpires over an extensive period, but it is of major importance. This finding may suggest that nonmalignant hypertension, while being a close surrogate and strong promoter of chronic kidney disease progression, is a relatively modest initiator of the disease.12,13 That the pathogenesis of hypertension involves a balanced afferent and efferent arteriolar constriction, maintaining a relatively preserved glomerular filtration rate despite reduced blood flow, can explain why hypertension, although a major risk factor of cerebrovascular and cardiac disease, is only a modest risk factor for chronic kidney disease progression and ESRD.13

    The association between hypertension and ESRD does not necessarily signify that hypertension is the cause of future ESRD. Although most data, especially from epidemiologic studies, support the belief that hypertension is a major cause of ESRD, some studies challenge this point of view, claiming that often the diagnosis of hypertensive nephrosclerosis, as the cause of ESRD, is based merely on the clinical judgment of the treating physician after excluding other known causes.13,22

    Studies based on pathologic report findings of kidney biopsies and autopsies found that many cases of ESRD are believed to be caused by hypertension and had other etiologies.23,24 Marcantoni et al23 assessed the kidney biopsies of African American and white patients without diabetes to find the association between elevated BP, proteinuria, and the pathologic morphologic structure of renal lesions. They concluded that vascular sclerosis lesions caused by hypertension were insufficient to account for clinical renal failure. Hsu’s25 meta-analysis of studies including patients with hypertension treated for at least 1 year with antihypertensive medications endeavored to explore this controversy. He showed that antihypertensive treatment did not reduce the risk of renal dysfunction, questioning again the role of nonmalignant essential hypertension in chronic kidney disease. It has been shown that the higher rates of ESRD attributable to hypertension in African Americans, compared with white individuals, were partly explained by the genetic polymorphism of the APOL1 (Gen Bank 8542) gene rather than by hypertension alone.26 The results of our study suggest that adolescents with established hypertension are at a greater risk for future ESRD, however, it is still ambiguous whether hypertension is the cause of ESRD.

    Limitations and Strengths

    This study has several limitations. A noteworthy limitation is that we did not obtain any relevant clinical information such as BP levels during the follow-up period that might have affected the risk for future ESRD. However, Gray et al6 found that a hypertension diagnosis in middle-aged individuals only slightly attenuated the association between late-adolescence hypertension and cardiovascular mortality, emphasizing the potential role of adolescent hypertension itself. Another possible limitation was the lack of information as to the estimated glomerular filtration rate at the time of the medical examination. Nevertheless, all individuals with hypertension were evaluated to exclude renal disease. We excluded individuals with abnormal urinalysis findings and kidney-associated comorbidities, thus minimizing the probability that the study’s participants had an abnormal glomerular filtration rate. Furthermore, the outcome of the study comprised only individuals with ESRD without incorporating other levels of chronic kidney disease. In light of our findings, we would assume that this has yielded an underestimation of the association between hypertension and ESRD. Similar results were observed when only individuals enrolled from 1977 were included. In this subanalysis, the oldest participant would have been 30 years of age at the beginning of the registry with an extremely low rate of possibly missed ESRD cases.

    This study has several strengths. It is a large population-based cohort including males and females from different racial/ethnic and socioeconomic backgrounds. The detailed data derived from the recruitment centers and the ESRD registry enabled us to adjust for most of the known confounders of hypertension. This study links well-established late-adolescence hypertension and ESRD; other studies have defined hypertension based only on 1 BP measurement. This definition of hypertension is known to be biased, especially in this population, owing to the stressful situation of the conscription examination itself and to the high rates of white-coat hypertension syndrome in this age group.27 Although up to 75% of hypertension cases in adolescents are essential,28 to exclude cases of secondary hypertension, we labeled individuals as hypertensive only if they were designated with diagnostic codes of essential hypertension. We excluded all individuals with known kidney disease or known to have morbidities that may reflect kidney disease such as microhematuria. Furthermore, we emphasized the independent role of essential hypertension unrelated to obesity. Finally, we showed that the association of hypertension with future ESRD was maintained among those who had received only a mild or moderate severity hypertension diagnosis.

    Conclusions

    Late-adolescence well-established essential hypertension appears to be associated with future ESRD. This association was found regardless of overweight condition and severity of the hypertension.

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    Article Information

    Accepted for Publication: November 9, 2018.

    Corresponding Author: Ehud Grossman, MD, Internal Medicine D and Hypertension Unit, The Chaim Sheba Medical Center, 2 Derech Sheba, Migdal Ishpuz, 1st Floor, Ramat Gan 5266202, Israel (grosse@tauex.tau.ac.il).

    Published Online: February 25, 2019. doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.7632

    Author Contributions: Drs Leiba and Fishman contributed equally to this manuscript. Drs Lieba and Fishman had full access to all of the data in the study and take responsibility for the integrity of the data and the accuracy of the data analysis.

    Concept and design: Leiba, Fishman, Gilad, Derazne, Shamiss, Shohat, Grossman.

    Acquisition, analysis, or interpretation of data: Leiba, Fishman, Twig, Derazne, Shohat, Ron, Grossman.

    Drafting of the manuscript: Leiba, Fishman, Twig, Gilad, Ron, Grossman.

    Critical revision of the manuscript for important intellectual content: Leiba, Fishman, Twig, Gilad, Derazne, Shamiss, Shohat, Grossman.

    Statistical analysis: Leiba, Fishman, Twig, Derazne.

    Administrative, technical, or material support: Fishman, Twig, Shohat, Ron.

    Supervision: Grossman.

    Conflict of Interest Disclosures: None reported.

    Additional Contributions: The authors thank Mrs Phyllis Curchack Kornspan for her editorial services; she received compensation for her contribution.

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