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In This Issue of Archives of Internal Medicine
June 26, 2006

In This Issue of Archives of Internal Medicine

Arch Intern Med. 2006;166(12):1255. doi:10.1001/archinte.166.12.1255

Coffee intake may be associated with reduced risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus because of minerals, phytochemicals, and antioxidants in coffee, but the role of caffeine is unclear. Pereira et al examine the association between total, caffeinated, and decaffeinated coffee intake and risk of incident type 2 diabetes mellitus. This prospective analysis included 28 812 postmenopausal women free of diabetes and cardiovascular disease in the general community. Compared with women who reported 0 cups of coffee per day, women who consumed 6 or more cups per day had a 22% lower risk of diabetes. This association appeared to be largely explained by decaffeinated coffee rather than regular coffee. Intakes of caffeine from all courses was not associated with risk of diabetes. The authors conclude that coffee intake, especially decaffeinated, was inversely associated with risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus in this cohort of postmenopausal women.

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