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Article
December 1930

SPHENOPALATINE PHENOMENA: PRESENT STATUS OF KNOWLEDGE

Author Affiliations

In Collaboration with; DETROIT

From the Jefferson Clinic and Diagnostic Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1930;46(6):1026-1038. doi:10.1001/archinte.1930.00140180127013
Abstract

Our object in this paper is to bring together the more important observations that have accumulated in the literature on the sphenopalatine ganglion during the past twenty-five years and the more important observations that have been made during eight years of original work on this subject. The original work includes more than 2,000 cases and more than 10,000 instances, counting multiples and repetitions, of remote dysfunctions1 being arrested by anesthetizing the sphenopalatine ganglions. This should provide a working guide that will bring the student of the subject to the front lines of advance without unnecessary delay.

Anesthetization of the sphenopalatine ganglions and the injection of alcohol into them have one feature in common: They render the ganglions impervious to the passage of nerve currents. An injection may be considered the equivalent of an anesthetization lasting several months instead of several hours, and so the associate phenomena need not be discussed

References
1.
The term dysfunction is here used as synonymous with Sir Arthur Lovatt Evans' phrase, "a state of disease:" "A state of disease is never a thing in itself, but is always a quantitative change in some physiological process, an increase or diminution of something that was there to begin with." (Address of the President, Section 1, Physiology, British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1928.) Dysfunction, then, is a quantitative change whereby a function passes beyond physiologic limits, and arrest of dysfunction is a quantitative return of the process to within physiologic limits. Any less comprehensive term would be insufficient to include the wide range of phenomena observed. In many of these cases the arrest of a malady leaves no detectible trace of a pathologic process; it is as if no such process had existed; in others a residuum of the process remains, but soon disappears, as if the process had been arrested. In still other cases the pathologic process seems to be arrested for the time, but tends to recur at varying intervals. The most accurate term applicable to these varying phases would seem to be "dysfunction."
2.
 J. Michigan M. Soc. 29:294 [ (April) ] 1930
3.
Sluder,  Greenfield: Nasal Neurology, Headaches and Eye Disorders , St. Louis, C. V. Mosby Company, 1927.
4.
Unpublished cases of the authors.
5.
Ryerson, F. L.: Personal communication to the authors.
6.
Byrd, H.:  Pathological Impulses or Currents ,  M. J. & Rec. 121:141 ( (Feb.) ) 1925.
7.
Miller, H. E., quoted by Sluder (footnote 3, p. 99).
8.
Byrd, H.:  Influence of Nasal Ganglion in Treatment of Glaucoma ,  Arch. Ophth. 56:162 ( (March) ) 1927.
9.
Clerf, L. H.:  Control, Through the Nasal Ganglion, of Earache of Laryngeal Origin ,  J. A. M. A. 82:630 ( (Feb. 23) ) 1924.
10.
Gugenheim, L. K., quoted by Sluder (footnote 3, p. 273).
11.
Hansel, F. K.:  Otalgia from Abscess of the Tongue Controlled by Cocainization of the Nasal Ganglion ,  Arch. Otolaryng. 7:165 ( (Feb.) ) 1928.
12.
Lillie, H. W., quoted by Sluder (footnote 3, p. 273).
13.
Cook, J. D.:  Symptomatology of a Case of Sphenopalatine Ganglion Neurosis ,  J. Missouri M. A. 21:319 ( (Sept.) ) 1924.
14.
Ruskin, S. L.:  The Nasal Ganglion in Relation to Itching of the Auditory Canal and Tinnitis Aurium ,  Arch. Otolaryng. 2:269 ( (Sept.) ) 1925
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 Herpes Zoster Oticus Relieved by Sphenopalatine Ganglion Treatment ,  Laryngoscope 35:301 ( (April) ) 1925.
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Ruskin (footnote 14, first reference).
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Ruskin (footnote 14, second reference).
18.
Ruskin, S. L.:  Contributions to Study of the Sphenopalatine Ganglion ,  Laryngoscope 35:87 ( (Feb.) ) 1925.
19.
Dean, L. W.:  The Control of Glossodnia ,  South. M. J. 15:856 ( (Oct.) ) 1922.
20.
Engman, M. F., quoted by Sluder (footnote 3, p. 273).
21.
Hoople, G. D.:  A New Method of Anesthesia for Opening Peritonsillar Abscess ,  Laryngoscope 36:577 ( (Aug.) ) 1926.
22.
Gundru, L. K.:  Pain from Tuberculous Laryngitis Relieved by Cocainization of the Nasal Ganglion ,  J. A. M. A. 83:998 (Sept. 27) 1924.
23.
Gundrum, L. K.:  Migraine Controlled Through the Nasal Ganglion ,  Arch. Otolaryng. 8:564 ( (Nov.) ) 1928.
24.
Heitger, J. D., quoted by Sluder (footnote 3, p. 289).
25.
Warren, E. W.: Personal communication to the authors.
26.
Chester, John L.: Personal communication to the authors.
27.
Goldschmidt-Osmund, Bruno, quoted by Sluder (footnote 3, p. 101).
28.
Ruskin, S. L., quoted by Sluder (footnote 3, p. 279).
29.
Payne, R. J.:  Treatment of Nasal Ganglion in Hay Fever ,  J. Missouri M. A. 21:257 ( (Aug.) ) 1924.
30.
Gundrum, L. K.:  Nasal Ganglion Neuroses ,  California & West. Med. 24:204 ( (Feb.) ) 1926.
31.
Byrd, H.:  Hay Fever, Its Control Through Efferent Interception ,  Ann. Int. Med. 3:850 ( (Feb.) ) 1930
32.
Hay Fever, Its Surgical Conquest, Laryngoscope, to be published.
33.
Hansel, F. K., quoted by Sluder (footnote 3, p. 275).
34.
Rehfeldt, C. S.:  Control of Intractable Singultus (Hiccough) Through the Nasal Ganglion ,  Laryngoscope 35:354 ( (May) ) 1925.
35.
Costen, J. B.:  Persistent Hiccough: Control by Cocainization of the Nasal Ganglion ,  Ann. Otol. Rhin. & Laryng. 37:860 ( (Sept.) ) 1928.
36.
Gundrum, L. K.:  Asthma and Eczema Controlled Through the Nasal Ganglion ,  Ann. Clin. Med. 4:573 ( (Jan.) ) 1926.
37.
Byrd, Hiram; and Byrd, Wallace:  The Clinic as a Field for Biologic Research ,  Clin. Med. & Surg. 37:95 ( (Feb.) ) 1930.
38.
Byrd, H.:  The Sphenopalatine Test ,  J. Michigan M. Soc. 29:294 ( (April) ) 1930.
39.
Byrd (footnote 35, second reference).
40.
Sibley, C. P.: Personal communication to the authors.
41.
Byrd, H.:  Pathological Currents and Cancer ,  J. Cancer Research 3:13 ( (Oct.-Dec.) ) 1926
42.
footnote 4.
43.
Byrd (footnotes 4 and 35).
44.
Byrd, H.:  Blocking Off Remote Pain at the Nasal Ganglia ,  M. J. & Rec. 120:126 ( (suppl.) ) (Oct. 15) 1924
45.
footnote 36.
46.
Saunders, D. U.: Personal communication to the authors.
47.
Byrd (footnote 4; footnote 40, first reference).
48.
Byrd, H.:  Chorea ,  Arch. Otolaryng. 7:257 ( (March) ) 1928.
49.
Dock, George:  Sluder's Nasal Ganglion Syndrome and Its Relation to Internal Medicine ,  J. A. M. A. 93:750 ( (Sept. 7) ) 1929.
50.
Pollock, H. L., quoted by Sluder (footnote 3, p. 276).
51.
Dock, George: Personal communication to the authors.
52.
Sluder (footnote 3).
53.
Byrd (footnote 4).
54.
Byrd (footnote 4).
55.
Pollock (footnote 45).
56.
Whenever the ganglion has been anesthetized for any purpose, the following simple test for tonsillar anesthesia is suggested: With an applicator carrying a wisp of cotton compare the two tonsils for sensitiveness.
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