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Article
April 1914

BLOOD-PRESSURES: THEIR RELATION TO EACH OTHER AND TO PHYSICAL EFFICIENCY

Author Affiliations

PITTSBURGH, PA.

From the Department of Student Health, Carnegie Institute of Technology.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1914;XIII(4):648-655. doi:10.1001/archinte.1914.00070100141015
Abstract

In this communication we desire to record the blood-pressure findings in a total of 742 males with particular reference to the diastolic and pulse pressures; also the relations between blood-pressure and physical efficiency.

METHODS  In these blood-pressure readings we used a mercury manometer of the usual type with 12 cm. cuff, and we made our determinations by the auscultatory method.The maximum pressure was determined in all cases at the first sound. The minimum pressure in Series A was read at the time of disappearance of all sounds (fifth phase) ; and in Series B, more accurately at the point of the last clear sound preceding the final dull tones. This is known as the fourth phase. Obviously, then, we get a reading somewhat higher when we make our readings at the final sharp tone than if we wait for the disappearance of all sounds. The difference may be as

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Barach, Joseph H.:  Physiological and Pathological Effect of Severe Exertion (the Marathon Race) on the Circulatory and Renal System ,  The Archives Int. Med. , 1910, v, 382.Crossref
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