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    Original Investigation
    Public Health
    April 30, 2020

    Association of Childhood Psychomotor Coordination With Survival Up to 6 Decades Later

    Author Affiliations
    • 1Department of Epidemiology & Public Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom
    • 2School of Biological & Population Health Sciences, Oregon State University, Corvallis
    • 3Centre for Cognitive Ageing & Cognitive Epidemiology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom
    • 4Institute of Sport, Exercise & Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom
    • 5Department of Behavioural Science and Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom
    • 6Centre for Longitudinal Studies, University College London Institute of Education, London, United Kingdom
    JAMA Netw Open. 2020;3(4):e204031. doi:10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2020.4031
    Key Points español 中文 (chinese)

    Question  Is performance on a series of psychomotor coordination tests in childhood associated with mortality up to 6 decades later?

    Findings  In this birth cohort study of 17 415 individuals who underwent a series of psychomotor coordination tests in childhood, follow up was conducted over several decades. After taking into account confounding factors, lower performance on 3 gross and fine motors skills tests in childhood was associated with elevated death rates up to 6 decades later.

    Meaning  The findings of this study suggest that childhood motor coordination is associated with lower mortality up to middle-age; replication in other contexts using complementary observational approaches is warranted.

    Abstract

    Importance  Poorer performance on standard tests of motor coordination in children has emerging links with sedentary behavior, obesity, and functional capacity in later life. These observations are suggestive of an untested association of coordination with health outcomes, including mortality.

    Objective  To examine the association of performance on a series of psychomotor coordination tests in childhood with mortality up to 6 decades later.

    Design, Setting, and Participants  The British National Child Development Study (1958 Birth Cohort Study) is a prospective cohort study based on a nationally representative sample of births from England, Scotland, and Wales. A total of 17 415 individuals had their gross and fine motor psychomotor coordination assessed using 9 tests at ages 11 and 16 years. Data analysis for the present study was conducted from October 2016 to December 2019.

    Main Outcomes and Measures  All-cause mortality as ascertained from a vital status registry and survey records.

    Results  In this birth cohort study of 17 415 individuals who underwent a series of psychomotor coordination tests in childhood, follow up was conducted over several decades. Of the analytical sample of 12 678 individuals, 51% were male, and 72% came from a lower social group. Mortality surveillance between ages 12 and 58 years in an analytical sample of 17 062 men and women yielded 1072 deaths (766 661 person-years at risk). In survival analyses with adjustment for sex, higher scores on 7 of the 9 childhood coordination tests were associated with a lower risk of mortality in a stepwise manner. After controlling for early-life socioeconomic, health, cognitive, and developmental factors, lower mortality was statistically significantly associated with 3 tests: ball catching at age 11 years (0-8 vs 10 catches: hazard ratio [HR], 1.57; 95% CI, 1.19-2.07), match-picking at age 11 years (>50 vs 0-36 seconds: HR, 1.33; 95% CI, 1.09-1.63), and hopping at age 16 years (very unsteady vs very steady: HR, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.01-1.63).

    Conclusions and Relevance  The results of this cohort study suggest that childhood motor coordination is associated with lower mortality up to middle-age; these findings require replication.

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