SARS-CoV-2 Antibody Responses in Infection-Naive or Previously Infected Individuals After 1 and 2 Doses of the BNT162b2 Vaccine | Infectious Diseases | JAMA Network Open | JAMA Network
[Skip to Navigation]
Sign In
Figure.  SARS-CoV-2 Immunoglobin (Ig) G Serological Response in Infection-Naive and Previously Infected Individuals After 1 or 2 Doses of BNT162b2
SARS-CoV-2 Immunoglobin (Ig) G Serological Response in Infection-Naive and Previously Infected Individuals After 1 or 2 Doses of BNT162b2

Quantitative SARS-CoV-2 IgG levels at baseline (blue dots), 21 days after vaccine dose 1 (orange dots), and 28 days after vaccine dose 2 (brown dots) in infection-naive or previously infected individuals. Horizontal black bars represent mean quantitative IgG levels (AU/mL) within the indicated groups. Black dots represent 4 individuals with a previous positive SARS-CoV-2 polymerase chain reaction but did not have detectable SARS-CoV-2 IgG at baseline. Horizontal blue line denotes the assay limit of detection cutoff. Statistical analysis was performed using unpaired 2-tailed t test. AU indicates arbitrary unit.

1.
Polack  FP, Thomas  SJ, Kitchin  N,  et al; C4591001 Clinical Trial Group.  Safety and efficacy of the BNT162b2 mRNA Covid-19 vaccine.   N Engl J Med. 2020;383(27):2603-2615. doi:10.1056/NEJMoa2034577PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
2.
Manisty  C, Otter  AD, Treibel  TA,  et al.  Antibody response to first BNT162b2 dose in previously SARS-CoV-2-infected individuals.   Lancet. 2021;397(10279):1057-1058. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(21)00501-8PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
3.
Prendecki  M, Clarke  C, Brown  J,  et al.  Effect of previous SARS-CoV-2 infection on humoral and T-cell responses to single-dose BNT162b2 vaccine.   Lancet. 2021;397(10280):1178-1181. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(21)00502-XPubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
4.
Bradley  T, Grundberg  E, Selvarangan  R,  et al.  Antibody responses after a single dose of SARS-CoV-2 mRNA vaccine.   N Engl J Med. 2021;384(20):1959-1961. doi:10.1056/NEJMc2102051PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
Limit 200 characters
Limit 25 characters
Conflicts of Interest Disclosure

Identify all potential conflicts of interest that might be relevant to your comment.

Conflicts of interest comprise financial interests, activities, and relationships within the past 3 years including but not limited to employment, affiliation, grants or funding, consultancies, honoraria or payment, speaker's bureaus, stock ownership or options, expert testimony, royalties, donation of medical equipment, or patents planned, pending, or issued.

Err on the side of full disclosure.

If you have no conflicts of interest, check "No potential conflicts of interest" in the box below. The information will be posted with your response.

Not all submitted comments are published. Please see our commenting policy for details.

Limit 140 characters
Limit 3600 characters or approximately 600 words
    Views 30,983
    Citations 0
    Research Letter
    Infectious Diseases
    August 6, 2021

    SARS-CoV-2 Antibody Responses in Infection-Naive or Previously Infected Individuals After 1 and 2 Doses of the BNT162b2 Vaccine

    Author Affiliations
    • 1Abbott Laboratories, Abbott Diagnostics Division, Abbott Park, Illinois
    • 2Division of Allergy and Immunology, Department of Internal Medicine, Rush University Medical Center, Rush University, Chicago, Illinois
    JAMA Netw Open. 2021;4(8):e2119741. doi:10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2021.19741
    Introduction

    The Pfizer/BioNTech (BNT162b2) SARS-CoV-2 mRNA vaccine demonstrated 95% efficacy after 2 doses during clinical trials.1 There are reports that individuals with previous SARS-CoV-2 infection elicit stronger antibody responses after 1 dose compared with individuals without prior infection.2-4 Consequently, individuals with a documented prior COVID-19 infection may be sufficiently protected from reinfection after a single mRNA vaccine dose, which could free up availability of millions of additional doses. We evaluated the SARS-CoV-2 spike immunoglobin (Ig) G antibody levels after 1 and 2 BNT162b2 doses in previously infected individuals compared with those without previous infection.

    Methods

    This study was approved by the Rush University institutional review board, and all participants provided written informed consent. Participants for this cohort study (n = 59) were recruited at Rush University Medical Center and assigned to 2 groups based on evidence of previous SARS-CoV-2 infection. Evidence of previous SARS-CoV-2 infection included previous positive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test and/or positive SARS-CoV-2 antibody result at baseline. Self-reported demographic data including age, sex, and race/ethnicity were collected for statistical analysis. The self-reported categories for race/ethnicity were Black, White, Asian, and Hispanic. Group 1 (n = 30) had no evidence of previous SARS-CoV-2 infection and Group 2 (n = 29) did. SARS-CoV-2 spike IgG antibody levels from plasma were measured at baseline and after receiving 1 and 2 BNT162b2 doses. Samples were run on an Abbott ARCHITECT i2000SR and tested with CE marked SARS-CoV-2 Quant IgG II (List 6S60), which quantitatively measures IgG antibodies against the SARS-CoV-2 spike Receptor Binding Domain (spike-RBD). Results were reported in arbitrary units (AU)/mL (≥50.0 AU/mL is positive). Graphing and statistical analysis was conducted with Prism version 8.0.2 (GraphPad Software) using unpaired 2-tailed t tests from April to May 2021. Statistical significance was defined as P < .05.

    This manuscript was written following the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) reporting guideline for cohort studies. Additional information about the study design and participant demographics can be found in the eMethods and eTable in the Supplement.

    Results

    Among 59 participants, 29 (49%) were White individuals and 43 (73%) were female individuals. The mean (SD) age was 42 (12) years. Infection-naive participants (n = 30) had mean SARS-CoV-2 spike-RBD IgG levels at baseline of 4.03 AU/mL (95% CI, 1.92-6.13 AU/mL) and increasing to 1822 AU/mL (95% CI, 1266-2377 AU/mL) after 1 vaccine dose and to 15 005 AU/mL (95% CI, 12 533-17 476 AU/mL) after 2 vaccine doses (Figure). Previously infected individual’s (n = 29) mean IgG levels increased from 621.3 AU/mL (95% CI, 388.90-853.70 AU/mL) at baseline to 30 173 AU/mL (95% CI, 15 571-44 775 AU/mL) after 1 dose and 36 600 AU/mL (95% CI, 19 563-53 637 AU/mL) after 2 doses (Figure). Mean (standard error of the mean [SEM]) differences between second and first doses were 13 183 (1218) AU/mL (P < .001) in infection-naive participants. Mean (SEM) IgG differences were 6427 (10 876) AU/mL (P = .56) between second and first doses in previously infected individuals. Four previously infected participants reported a previous positive PCR but did not develop antibodies. Vaccine responses in these 4 participants resembled infection-naive individuals. Mean (SEM) antibody differences after 2 vaccine doses in infection-naive individuals compared with 1 and 2 vaccine doses in previously infected individuals were 15 168 (6963) AU/mL (P = .03) and 21 595 (7927) AU/mL (P = .009), respectively.

    Discussion

    We observed higher SARS-CoV-2 antibody levels in previously infected individuals after 1 dose of BNT162b2 compared with infection-naive individuals after 2 doses. Importantly, in previously infected individuals with positive SARS-CoV-2 spike IgG levels, the second dose did not significantly increase IgG levels compared with the first dose, suggesting that 1 dose may be acceptable in this group. However, it is important to note that a positive PCR diagnosis alone was not enough to discount the need for a second vaccine dose. In 4 participants who reported a positive PCR, but did not develop S-protein antibodies, the response to the first vaccine dose was more similar to that of the infection-naive group. Furthermore, these results highlight that even in previously infected individuals, baseline serological testing should be performed prior to deciding whether to forego a second vaccine dose.

    This study highlights the potential for recommending a single dose for previously infected individuals and may be useful for discussions surrounding vaccination strategy. Limitations of this study include small sample size, diversity of participants (sex, race, nationality), lack of neutralization studies, and lack of T-cell response studies.

    Back to top
    Article Information

    Accepted for Publication: May 27, 2021.

    Published: August 6, 2021. doi:10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2021.19741

    Open Access: This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the CC-BY-NC-ND License. © 2021 Anderson M et al. JAMA Network Open.

    Corresponding Author: James Moy, MD, Division of Allergy and Immunology, Department of Internal Medicine, Rush University Medical Center, 1725 W Harrison St, Ste 117, Chicago, IL 60612 (jmoy@rush.edu).

    Author Contributions: Drs Anderson and Moy had full access to all of the data in the study and take responsibility for the integrity of the data and the accuracy of the data analysis.

    Concept and design: Anderson, Landay, Cloherty, Moy.

    Acquisition, analysis, or interpretation of data: All authors.

    Drafting of the manuscript: Anderson, Landay, Cloherty, Moy.

    Critical revision of the manuscript for important intellectual content: All authors.

    Statistical analysis: Anderson, Moy.

    Obtained funding: Cloherty, Moy.

    Administrative, technical, or material support: Anderson, Stec, Cloherty, Moy.

    Supervision: Anderson, Landay, Cloherty, Moy.

    Conflict of Interest Disclosures: None reported.

    Funding/Support: This work was supported by Abbott Diagnostics Division Research and Development funding.

    Role of the Funder/Sponsor: The funder had no role in the design and conduct of the study; collection, management, analysis, and interpretation of the data; preparation, review, or approval of the manuscript; and decision to submit the manuscript for publication.

    References
    1.
    Polack  FP, Thomas  SJ, Kitchin  N,  et al; C4591001 Clinical Trial Group.  Safety and efficacy of the BNT162b2 mRNA Covid-19 vaccine.   N Engl J Med. 2020;383(27):2603-2615. doi:10.1056/NEJMoa2034577PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
    2.
    Manisty  C, Otter  AD, Treibel  TA,  et al.  Antibody response to first BNT162b2 dose in previously SARS-CoV-2-infected individuals.   Lancet. 2021;397(10279):1057-1058. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(21)00501-8PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
    3.
    Prendecki  M, Clarke  C, Brown  J,  et al.  Effect of previous SARS-CoV-2 infection on humoral and T-cell responses to single-dose BNT162b2 vaccine.   Lancet. 2021;397(10280):1178-1181. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(21)00502-XPubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
    4.
    Bradley  T, Grundberg  E, Selvarangan  R,  et al.  Antibody responses after a single dose of SARS-CoV-2 mRNA vaccine.   N Engl J Med. 2021;384(20):1959-1961. doi:10.1056/NEJMc2102051PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref
    ×