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Editorial
January 2019

Challenges in Defining Inappropriate Medication Use in Parkinson Disease Dementia

Author Affiliations
  • 1Fixel Center for Neurological Diseases, Department of Neurology, University of Florida, Gainesville
JAMA Neurol. 2019;76(1):17-19. doi:10.1001/jamaneurol.2018.2826

Parkinson disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder. Cognitive impairment is a major nonmotor feature of Parkinson disease, and most patients with Parkinson disease will meet the criteria for dementia in the second decade after diagnosis.1 National prescribing trends for patients with Parkinson disease and dementia are not well studied in the United States, and available data often exclude geographic location, race/ethnicity, and sex. In this editorial, we review the findings of the study by Mantri et al1 regarding patterns of antidementia medication use, and we address the challenges in defining and studying inappropriate medication prescribing in Parkinson disease.

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