[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 35.171.146.16. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
September 1960

Relationship Between Candidacy and Outcome in Surgery for Parkinsonism

Author Affiliations

New York
Assistant Clinical Professor, Division of Neuromuscular Diseases New York University Post-Graduate Medical School and Assistant Neurosurgeon, St. Barnabas Hospital (Dr. Lin). Instructor of the Surgical Department, New York University Post-Graduate Medical School (Dr. Dierssen). Resident, Department of Neurosurgery, St. Barnabas Hospital (Dr. Mingrino). Professor of Research. Surgery, New York University-Bellevue Medical Center; Director, Division of Neuromuscular Diseases New York University Post Graduate School of Medicine, and Director, Department of Neurosurgery, St. Barnabas Hospital (Dr. Cooper).

Arch Neurol. 1960;3(3):267-270. doi:10.1001/archneur.1960.00450030045004
Abstract

The importance of preoperative selection of patients for achievement of better postoperative results in basal ganglia surgery has been repeatedly emphasized in the past publications.1-4 It is the purpose of this paper to substantiate the empirically formulated conceptions concerning the selection of Parkinsonian patients for surgery and also to study the factors influencing the outcome of surgical treatment.

Design of Study  Four groups of patients were selected for this study, and their surgical results were compiled and compared. The first group were the patients with tremor, rigidity, and motor dysfunction confined to extremities of one side. They were called unilateral Parkinsonism, though some of them could not so be designated in a strict sense, owing to the facioaxial symptoms. The second group were patients who had mild Parkinsonian symptoms or those with moderate symptoms either unilateral or bilateral, but fully self-sufficient and actively employed. All of the patients in

×