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Article
July 1964

The Rhinencephalon and Related Structures. vol 3. Progress in Brain Research.

Arch Neurol. 1964;11(1):100-101. doi:10.1001/archneur.1964.00460190104008

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Abstract

Although numerous attempts have been made in recent years to define the functional and anatomical organization of the rhinencephalon, relatively few of these attempts have met with any measure of success. The major reason for this, as noted by the conference chairman of this symposium (Brodal), is the lack of definition of the term "rhinencephalon." And if the participants at this conference held in Kield, in 1962, failed to come to some agreement on the meaning of this term, at least their efforts have yielded a collection of essays which should contribute to the final resolution of this important problem. A total of fourteen reports are contained in this symposium volume of which three are concerned with the relationship of electrophysiological and behavioral findings with anatomical features of different components of the rhinencephalon. The remainder are primarily anatomical and consider subjects ranging from studies of the gross morphology of the

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