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Article
February 1967

Western Encephalitis and Cerebral Ontogenesis

Author Affiliations

San Francisco; Porterville, Calif
From the Department of Neurology and the Institute of Medical Sciences, Presbyterian Medical Center, San Francisco (Dr. Finley, Mrs. Fitzgerald, Dr. Richter, and Miss Riggs); and the Porterville State Hospital, California State Department of Mental Hygiene, Porterville (Dr. Shelton). This study is from the Encephalitis Clinical Follow-Up Study, a joint project of the California State Department of Public Health, several local California health departments, Stanford University School of Medicine (1953-1960), the Department of Neurology and the Institute of Medical Sciences, Presbyterian Medical Center (1960 to present), and from the Porterville State Hospital of the California State Department of Mental Hygiene.

Arch Neurol. 1967;16(2):140-164. doi:10.1001/archneur.1967.00470200028003
Abstract

And if you say, "Why should we trouble with these relics and with all this past history?" then I will say that in order to understand the correct functioning of the nervous system and its pathology, we need to know the evolutionary and embryological processes that have made it what it is. How else should we expect to learn how to control and heal it?1

WESTERN encephalitis (WE) virus has special proclivity for the nervous systems of infants. Between 25% and 30% of all cases of WE occur in infants less than 1 year of age.2 Furthermore, sequelae are much more frequent and more severe When the illness occurs in infancy than when it occurs in older persons.3-5 A recent analysis of findings of the California Encephalitis Clinical Follow-Up Study, which is now in its second decade, showed that 79% of 29 children who had WE

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