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Article
September 1969

PAIN RESEMBLING AN ELECTRICAL DISCHARGE FOLLOWING CEPHALIC FLEXION IN FOCAL SCLEROSIS. A CASE OF THE SENSITIVE FORM OF MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS

Arch Neurol. 1969;21(3):339-340. doi:10.1001/archneur.1969.00480150129017
Abstract

Neurologists agree that sensory disturbances frequently occur in the initial phase of multiple sclerosis. This was brought out at the last Paris neurological meeting. Professor G. Guillain's paper quite rightly emphasized the special characteristics of these subjective disturbances and showed that it is proper to rely upon them in establishing an early diagnosis of multiple sclerosis.

The patient we present now seems to be a fine example of the "sensitive form" of multiple sclerosis. We think her clinical history deserves attention because of the number and diversity of her disordered sensations.

Case. Mrs. D., cashier, 43 years old, without significant personal or hereditary background, married, and mother of a healthy child, became ill in July 1923 with an acute intestinal attack accompanied by abdominal pains and diarrhea. A few days after the end of this episode, she suffered a rather violent headache accompanied by tingling in the feet and knees.

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