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Article
September 1976

Giant Cell Tumor of the Temporal Bone

Author Affiliations

Dept of Radiation Therapy Veterans Administration Hospital Bronx, NY 10468

Arch Neurol. 1976;33(9):663. doi:10.1001/archneur.1976.00500090069019
Abstract

A patient with giant cell tumor of the temporal bone was treated with radiation therapy. Although the symptoms were relieved temporarily, inoperable tumor growth developed.

Report of a Case.—  We examined a 61-year-old man who had developed vertigo three months prior to hospital admission and two weeks later, diminished hearing and tinnitus in the right ear. One month prior to admission, he became hoarse and developed a dysphagia.Physical examination showed a postauricular bruit bilaterally. There was a mild right facial palsy as well as diminished hearing in the right ear. He was hoarse, had difficulty swallowing, and his tongue deviated to the right. The cerebrospinal fluid had a protein content of 81 mg/100 ml.A red mass was seen behind the right tympanic membrane. X-ray films showed an erosive or destructive lesion involving the right petrous bone, jugular fossa, occipital bone, and occipital condyle.A biopsy specimen of

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