[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 18.207.136.184. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
December 1985

Physicians' Attitudes: Management of Carotid Artery Plaques, Murmurs, and Transient Ischemic Attacks

Author Affiliations

From the Departments of Ophthalmology and Neurology, North Carolina Baptist Hospital (Dr Till), and the Department of Neurology, Bowman Gray School of Medicine (Dr Toole and Ms Howard), Winston-Salem, NC.

Arch Neurol. 1985;42(12):1198-1201. doi:10.1001/archneur.1985.04060110080021
Abstract

In a survey of physicians from five different locations around the United States and Canada,1 we determined that there were great differences in attitudes between physicians from different regions as well as between physicians from different specialties. We conducted another survey of physicians at our medical center (one of the study sites from the earlier study) to determine whether physicians' diagnostic approach and therapy varied by specialty or years of experience and if these have changed since a survey in 1979.

METHODS  In May 1983, 500 questionnaires were distributed to the attending physicians and house officers of North Carolina Baptist Hospital (NCBH), Winston-Salem. The physicians, representing all specialties, were invited to complete and return the questionnaire (Table 1). A cover letter was sent with each questionnaire that explained the purpose of the study and that each respondent would be sent a synopsis of the results. This cover letter

×