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Article
January 1989

Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Moyamoya Disease

Author Affiliations

Baylor Multiple Sclerosis Clinic Department of Neurology Baylor College of Medicine Texas Medical Center Houston, TX 77030

Arch Neurol. 1989;46(1):14. doi:10.1001/archneur.1989.00520370016009
Abstract

To the Editor.  —I wish to congratulate Bruno and colleagues1 on their excellent study of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in young adults with cerebral infarction due to moyamoya disease. I would like to add to their discussion by interjecting a note of caution about the nonspecificity of MRI in this condition.We reported the first use of MRI in moyamoya disease2 in a patient initially thought to have multiple sclerosis (MS). Our patient, like most of those in the article by Bruno et al, was a young woman with fluctuating neurologic findings in whom the MRI showed multifocal bilateral areas of increased signal intensity ranging in size from 2 mm to 3 cm, with an appearance identical to that of MS plaques. Unlike their patients, her lesions were not concentrated in watershed areas, nor was the middle cerebral artery signal-void flow sign absent. Our patient also had abnormal brain-stem

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