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Controversies in Neurology
June 1999

Do We Have Drugs for Dementia?No

Author Affiliations

From Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada

 

VLADIMIRHACHINSKIMD, FRCPC, DScMed

Arch Neurol. 1999;56(6):735-737. doi:10.1001/archneur.56.6.735

ADDRESSING causative rather than symptomatic treatments, I suggest that the following are the appropriate goals of antidementia therapy: (1) to improve the patient's capacity to perform the basic or instrumental activities of daily living; (2) to improve the quality of life of the patient and/or the caregiver; (3) to improve memory and other cognitive and behavioral functions to the extent that this leads to clinically relevant improvements; and (4) to slow the course of the disease with respect to measurable cognitive decline and the level of care required, in comparison with placebo therapy.

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