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Controversies in Neurology
September 2006

Transient Global Amnesia: The Continuing Quest for a Source

Author Affiliations

Author Affiliation: Department of Neurology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC.

Arch Neurol. 2006;63(9):1336-1338. doi:10.1001/archneur.63.9.1336

Because of its vague and short-lived nature, transient global amnesia (TGA) in many ways resembles a transient ischemic attack. While the event rate of transient neurological symptoms in general is probably underreported, TGA has a significantly lower annual incidence and recurrence rate than transient ischemic attacks.1-4 Additionally, TGA typically lasts longer than a transient ischemic attack and is not accompanied by focal physical signs or abnormal diagnostic study results.5-7 In the absence of specific objective findings, the diagnosis of TGA is based on clinical observation or history, and its pathogenesis remains obscure.

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