Positron Emission Tomography and Neuropathologic Estimates of Fibrillar Amyloid-β in a Patient With Down Syndrome and Alzheimer Disease | Radiology | JAMA Neurology | JAMA Network
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Observation
Nov 2011

Positron Emission Tomography and Neuropathologic Estimates of Fibrillar Amyloid-β in a Patient With Down Syndrome and Alzheimer Disease

Author Affiliations

Author Affiliations: Banner Sun Health Research Institute, Sun City, Arizona (Drs Sabbagh, Rogers, Jacobson, Charney, Belden, and Beach and Mss Berk, Sue, Liebsack, and Cole); Banner Alzheimer's Institute (Drs Fleisher, Chen, and Reiman), Translational Genomics Research Institute and Department of Psychiatry, University of Arizona (Dr Reiman), and Arizona Alzheimer's Consortium (Drs Sabbagh, Fleisher, Chen, Rogers, Reiman, Jacobson, Charney, Belden, and Beach and Mss Sue and Liebsack), Phoenix, Arizona; Avid Radiopharmaceuticals, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (Drs Pontecorvo, Mintun, and Skovronsky); and Department of Neurosciences, University of California, San Diego (Dr Fleisher).

Arch Neurol. 2011;68(11):1461-1466. doi:10.1001/archneurol.2011.535
Abstract

Background Down syndrome appears to be associated with a virtually certain risk of fibrillar amyloid-β (Aβ) pathology by the age of 40 and a very high risk of dementia at older ages. The positron emission tomography (PET) ligand florbetapir F18 has been shown to characterize fibrillar Aβ in the living human brain and to provide a close correlation with subsequent Aβ neuropathology in individuals proximate to and after the end of life. The extent to which the most frequently used PET ligands can be used to detect fibrillar Aβ in patients with Down syndrome remains to be determined.

Objectives To characterize PET estimates of fibrillar Aβ burden in a Down syndrome patient very close to the end of life and to compare them with neuropathologic assessment made after his death.

Design/Methods With the family's informed consent, florbetapir PET was used to study a 55-year-old Down syndrome patient with Alzheimer disease near the end of life; his brain was donated for neuropathologic assessment when he died 14 days later. Visual ratings of cerebral florbetapir uptake were performed by trained readers who were masked to the patient's diagnosis as part of a larger study, and an automated algorithm was used to characterize regional-to-cerebellar standard uptake value ratios in 6 cerebral regions of interest. Neuropathologic assessments were performed masked to the patient's diagnosis or PET measurements.

Results Visual ratings and automated analyses of the PET image revealed a heavy fibrillar Aβ burden in cortical, striatal, and thalamic regions, similar to that reported for patients with late-onset Alzheimer disease. This matched neuropathologic findings of frequent neuritic and diffuse plaques, as well as frequent amyloid angiopathy, except for neuropathologically demonstrated frequent cerebellar diffuse plaques and amyloid angiopathy that were not detected by the PET scan.

Conclusions Florbetapir PET can be used to detect increased cerebral-to-cerebellar fibrillar Aβ burden in a Down syndrome patient with Alzheimer disease, even in the presence of frequent amyloid angiopathy and diffuse plaques in the cerebellum. Additional studies are needed to determine the extent to which PET could be used to detect and to track fibrillar Aβ and to evaluate investigational Aβ-modifying treatments in the presymptomatic and symptomatic stages of Alzheimer disease.

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