Media Dissemination of the Montreal Cognitive Assessment After President Donald Trump’s Medical Evaluation | Dementia and Cognitive Impairment | JAMA Neurology | JAMA Network
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Research Letter
October 2018

Media Dissemination of the Montreal Cognitive Assessment After President Donald Trump’s Medical Evaluation

Author Affiliations
  • 1Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • 2Terrence Donnelly Heart Centre, Division of Cardiology, St Michael’s Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • 3Centre for Quality Improvement and Patient Safety, Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
JAMA Neurol. 2018;75(10):1286-1287. doi:10.1001/jamaneurol.2018.1777

The cognitive fitness of President of the United States Donald Trump and the ethics of his cognitive evaluation have been the topic of intense discussion among both the general public and medical professionals in recent months.1 Most modern presidents of the United States have undergone routine yearly medical assessments during their tenure in office. On January 16, 2018, the physician to the president, Rear Admiral Ronny Jackson, MD, held a press briefing on President Trump’s first such assessment, which included the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA), an extensively validated screening tool for mild cognitive impairment in older individuals.2 Jackson’s announcement was notable because President Trump is thought to be the first President of the United States to undergo formal cognitive evaluation while in office.

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