Ropinirole for the Treatment of Early Parkinson Disease: A 12-Month Experience | Movement Disorders | JAMA Neurology | JAMA Network
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Original Contribution
September 1998

Ropinirole for the Treatment of Early Parkinson Disease: A 12-Month Experience

Author Affiliations

From the Departments of Neurology, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta (Dr Sethi); Colorado Neurological Institute, Englewood (Dr O'Brien); Oregon Health Sciences University, Portland (Dr Hammerstad); Mayo Clinic–Scottsdale, Scottsdale, Ariz (Dr Adler); Vanderbilt University Hospital, Nashville, Tenn (Dr Davis); Taylor Medical Group, Baltimore, Md (Dr Taylor); Miami Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Miami, Fla (Dr Sanchez-Ramos); Creighton University Medical Center, Omaha, Neb (Dr Bertoni); and University of South Florida, Tampa (Dr Hauser).

Arch Neurol. 1998;55(9):1211-1216. doi:10-1001/pubs.Arch Neurol.-ISSN-0003-9942-55-9-noc7365
Abstract

Objective  To evaluate ropinirole hydrochloride as dopaminergic monotherapy in patients with early Parkinson disease.

Design  A 6-month extension of a double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

Setting  Ambulatory care at 22 different sites in the United States.

Patients  Patients who successfully completed the initial 6-month study could enter the 6-month extension study (ropinirole, n=70; placebo, n=77).

Intervention  Use of ropinirole or placebo therapy.

Main Outcome Measures  The efficacy variables were the number of patients who successfully completed the 12-month study and did not require supplemental levodopa, the number of patients requiring supplemental levodopa, and the proportion of patients having an insufficient therapeutic response.

Results  Significantly fewer ropinirole-treated patients met criteria for insufficient therapeutic response (23 [19.8%] of 116) or required the initiation of levodopa therapy (22 [19%] of 116) compared with placebo-treated patients (60 [48%] of 125 patients for insufficient therapeutic response; 57 [45.6%] of 125 patients for additional levodopa). Significantly more ropinirole-treated patients (51 [44.0%] of 116) successfully completed the 12-month study and did not require supplemental levodopa compared with placebo-treated patients (28 [22.4%] of 125). The incidence of adverse experiences and patient withdrawals was low.

Conclusion  Ropinirole was effective and well tolerated as monotherapy for 12 months in patients with early Parkinson disease.

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