Temporal Lobectomy in Congenital Porencephaly Associated With Hippocampal Sclerosis | Neurology | JAMA Neurology | JAMA Network
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Original Contribution
June 2003

Temporal Lobectomy in Congenital Porencephaly Associated With Hippocampal Sclerosis

Author Affiliations

From the Departments of Neurology (Drs Burneo, Faught, Knowlton, Martin, and Kuzniecky), Pediatrics (Dr Bebin), and Neurosurgery (Dr Morawetz), Epilepsy Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham.

Arch Neurol. 2003;60(6):830-834. doi:10.1001/archneur.60.6.830
Abstract

Background  Clinical and neuroimaging features of patients with epilepsy and coexisting extratemporal porencephaly and hippocampal sclerosis have been previously described.

Objective  To present the clinical characteristics and surgical outcome of 6 patients with intractable epilepsy and coexisting extratemporal porencephaly and hippocampal sclerosis.

Patients and Methods  Twenty-four patients with porencephaly and epilepsy were studied. Of these, 6 had an epileptogenic focus in the temporal region. All patients underwent video electroencephalogram monitoring, magnetic resonance imaging studies, and neuropsychological evaluation. Of the subset of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, 1 patient underwent intracranial electroencephalogram monitoring. Temporal lobe resection was performed in 5 patients. Outcomes were evaluated using the Engel classification.

Results  Freedom from seizures was achieved in all patients. Pathologic analysis of the resected tissue confirmed the presurgical diagnosis of mesial temporal sclerosis.

Conclusion  Patients with extratemporal porencephaly and intractable seizures should be evaluated early and be considered for temporal lobectomy if clinical, magnetic resonance imaging, and electroencephalogram findings support the diagnosis of temporal lobe onset seizures.

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